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Monetary Policy with Sectoral Linkages and Durable Goods

Author

Listed:
  • Ivan Petrella

    (Birkbeck, University of London)

  • Raffaele Rossi

    (Lancaster University)

  • Emiliano Santoro

    (Catholic University of Milan and University of Copenhagen)

Abstract

We study the normative implications of a New Keynesian model featuring intersectoral trade of intermediate goods between two sectors that produce durables and non-durables. The interplay between durability and sectoral production linkages fundamentally alters the intersectoral stabilization trade-off as it emerges in otherwise standard two-sector models. We compare the welfare properties of a timeless-perspective monetary policy with the performance of simple instrumental rules that adjust the policy rate in response to the output gap and alternative aggregate measures of final goods price inflation. Aggregating durable and non-durable inflation depending on the relative degrees of sectoral price stickiness may induce a severe bias. Input materials attenuate the response of sectoral inflations to movements in the real marginal costs, so that the effective slopes of the sectoral supply schedules are not properly accounted for by conventional measures of core inflation.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivan Petrella & Raffaele Rossi & Emiliano Santoro, 2012. "Monetary Policy with Sectoral Linkages and Durable Goods," Discussion Papers 12-19, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:1219
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/dp_2012/1219.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Campbell Leith & Ioana Moldovan & Raffaele Rossi, 2012. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a New Keynesian Model with Habits in Consumption," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 416-435, July.
    2. Carl Walsh, 2003. "Speed Limit Policies: The Output Gap and Optimal Monetary Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 265-278, March.
    3. Bouakez, Hafedh & Cardia, Emanuela & Ruge-Murcia, Francisco J., 2011. "Durable goods, inter-sectoral linkages and monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 730-745, May.
    4. Thomas A. Lubik & Frank Schorfheide, 2004. "Testing for Indeterminacy: An Application to U.S. Monetary Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 190-217, March.
    5. Dennis, Richard, 2010. "When is discretion superior to timeless perspective policymaking?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 266-277, April.
    6. Nao Sudo, 2012. "Sectoral Comovement, Monetary Policy Shocks, and Input–Output Structure," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44(6), pages 1225-1244, September.
    7. Bernanke, Ben, 1985. "Adjustment costs, durables, and aggregate consumption," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 41-68, January.
    8. Henrik Jensen, 2002. "Targeting Nominal Income Growth or Inflation?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 928-956, September.
    9. Brad E. Strum, 2009. "Monetary Policy in a Forward-Looking Input-Output Economy," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(4), pages 619-650, June.
    10. Jerome Adda & Russell Cooper, 2000. "Balladurette and Juppette: A Discrete Analysis of Scrapping Subsidies," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 778-806, August.
    11. Campbell Leith & Ioana Moldovan & Raffaele Rossi, 2012. "Optimal Monetary Policy in a New Keynesian Model with Habits in Consumption," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(3), pages 416-435, July.
    12. Aoki, Kosuke, 2001. "Optimal monetary policy responses to relative-price changes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 55-80, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Durable Goods; Input-Output Interactions; Monetary Policy; Interest Rate Rules;

    JEL classification:

    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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