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Occupational Segregation on the Basis of Gender: the Role of Entry-level Jobs


  • Paul W. Miller

    () (The University of Western Australia)

  • Yew Liang Lee


There has not been any major change in gender occupational segregation in recent years in Australia. The analyses presented in this paper, using data from the 1996 Census of Population and Housing, suggest that this occupational segregation stems more from gender differences in entry-level occupations than from gender differences in occupational mobility. Whether this is good or bad is unclear, as imposing the male occupational distribution on females will disadvantage them in terms of earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul W. Miller & Yew Liang Lee, 2004. "Occupational Segregation on the Basis of Gender: the Role of Entry-level Jobs," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 7(3), pages 355-374, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ozl:journl:v:7:y:2004:i:3:p:355-374

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mark Wooden & Simon Freidin & Nicole Watson, 2002. "The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA)Survey: Wave 1," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(3), pages 339-348.
    2. Robert Cummins & Helen Nistico, 2002. "Maintaining Life Satisfaction: The Role of Positive Cognitive Bias," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 37-69, March.
    3. Mark Wooden & Diana Warren, 2003. "The Characteristics of Casual and Fixed-Term Employment: Evidence from the HILDA Survey," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n15, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. Peter Dawkins & Paul Gregg & Rosanna Scutella, 2002. "The Growth of Jobless Households in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(2), pages 133-154.
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    Cited by:

    1. Juan D. Barón & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2010. "Occupational Segregation and the Gender Wage Gap in Private- and Public-Sector Employment: A Distributional Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(273), pages 227-246, June.
    2. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Tan, Michelle, 2011. "Noncognitive skills, occupational attainment, and relative wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-13, January.

    More about this item


    Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination Labor Force and Employment; Size; and Structure (by industry; occupation; demographic characteristics; etc.) Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets


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