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Imputed welfare estimates in regression analysis

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  • Chris Elbers
  • Jean O. Lanjouw
  • Peter Lanjouw

Abstract

We discuss the use of imputed data in regression analysis, in particular the use of highly disaggregated welfare indicators (from so-called 'poverty maps'). We show that such indicators can be used both as explanatory variables on the right-hand side and as the phenomenon to explain on the left-hand side. We try out practical ways of adjusting standard errors of the regression coefficients to reflect the error introduced by using imputed, rather than actual, welfare indicators. These are illustrated by regression experiments based on data from Ecuador. For regressions with imputed variables on the left-hand side, we argue that essentially the same aggregate relationships would be found with either actual or imputed variables. We address the methodological question of how to interpret aggregate relationships found in such regressions. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Chris Elbers & Jean O. Lanjouw & Peter Lanjouw, 2005. "Imputed welfare estimates in regression analysis," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 101-118, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:5:y:2005:i:1:p:101-118
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jnlecg/lbh056
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chris Elbers & Jean O. Lanjouw & Peter Lanjouw, 2003. "Micro--Level Estimation of Poverty and Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(1), pages 355-364, January.
    2. Murphy, Kevin M & Topel, Robert H, 2002. "Estimation and Inference in Two-Step Econometric Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 88-97, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Joseph Cummins & Anaka Aiyar, 2017. "Age-Profile Estimates of the Relationship Between Economic Growth and Child Health," Working Papers 201710, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
    2. Farrow, Andrew & Larrea, Carlos & Hyman, Glenn & Lema, German, 2005. "Exploring the spatial variation of food poverty in Ecuador," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 510-531.
    3. Beatrice Lorge Rogers & James Wirth & Kathy Macías & Parke Wilde, 2007. "Mapping Hunder in Panama: A Report on Mapping Malnutrition Prevalence," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 35, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
    4. Umar Serajuddin & Paolo Verme, 2015. "Who is Deprived? Who Feels Deprived? Labor Deprivation, Youth, and Gender in Morocco," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 140-163, March.
    5. Hoogeveen,Johannes G. & Schipper,Youdi, 2005. "Which inequality matters? Growth evidence based on small area welfare estimates in Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3592, The World Bank.
    6. Ospina Peralta, Pablo & Hollenstein, Patric, 2015. "Territorial Coalitions and Rural Dynamics in Ecuador. Why History Matters," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 85-95.
    7. repec:aru:wpaper:200902 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Araujo, M. Caridad & Ferreira, Francisco H.G. & Lanjouw, Peter & Özler, Berk, 2008. "Local inequality and project choice: Theory and evidence from Ecuador," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1022-1046, June.
    9. Baird, Sarah & McIntosh, Craig & Özler, Berk, 2013. "The regressive demands of demand-driven development," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 27-41.
    10. Beatrice Lorge Rogers & James Wirth & Kathy Macías & Parke Wilde, 2007. "Mapping Hunder: A Report on Mapping Malnutrition Prevalence in the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Panama," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 34, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
    11. Benson, Todd & Chamberlin, Jordan & Rhinehart, Ingrid, 2005. "Why the poor in rural Malawi are where they are: An Analysis of the Spatial Determinants of the Local Prevalence of Poverty," FCND discussion papers 198, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Miguel, Edward & Roland, Gérard, 2011. "The long-run impact of bombing Vietnam," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 1-15, September.
    13. Kam, Suan-Pheng & Hossain, Mahabub & Bose, Manik Lal & Villano, Lorena S., 2005. "Spatial patterns of rural poverty and their relationship with welfare-influencing factors in Bangladesh," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 551-567.
    14. Peter Warr & Sitthiroth Rasphone & Jayant Menon, 2015. "Two Decades of Declining Poverty Despite Rising Inequality in Laos," Departmental Working Papers 2015-13, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    15. Thomas Otter, 2009. "Does Inequality Harm Income Mobility and Growth? An Assessment of the Growth Impact of Income and Education Inequality in Paraguay 1992-2002," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 188, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
    16. Benson, Todd & Chamberlin, Jordan & Rhinehart, Ingrid, 2005. "An investigation of the spatial determinants of the local prevalence of poverty in rural Malawi," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(5-6), pages 532-550.
    17. Beatrice Lorge Rogers & Kathy Macías & Parke Wilde, "undated". "Atlas of Hunger and Malnutrition in the Dominican Republic," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 9602, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, revised 01 Apr 2007.
    18. Davalos, Maria E. & Meyer, Moritz, 2015. "Moldova : a story of upward economic mobility," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7167, The World Bank.
    19. Beatrice Lorge Rogers & James Wirth & Kathy Macías & Parke Wilde, 2007. "Mapping Hunger in Ecuador: A Report on Mapping Malnutrition Prevalence," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 9602, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
    20. Otter, Thomas, 2007. "Does Inequality Harm Income Mobility and Growth? An Assessment of the Growth Impact of Income and Education Inequality in Paraguay 1992: 2002," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Göttingen 2007 25, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    21. Mohamed Ayadi & Mohamed Amara, 2009. "Spatial Patterns and Geographic Determinants of Welfare and Poverty in Tunisia," Working Papers 478, Economic Research Forum, revised Mar 2009.

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