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Assessing the geographic impact of higher food prices in Guinea

Author

Listed:
  • Coulombe, Harold
  • Wodon, Quentin

Abstract

Telling a policy maker that poverty will increase due to the recent increase in food prices is not very useful; telling the policy makers where the impact is likely to be larger is better, so that measures to cope with the impact of the crisis can be targeted to areas that need them the most. This paper shows how to use poverty mapping techniques to assess where higher food prices are likely to hurt the most using Guinea census and survey data as a case study. The results suggest that in the case of a rice price increase, the poorest areas of the country will not be the hardest hit, especially if the potential positive impact of higher food prices on rice producers is taken into account, in which case poverty may decline in some of these areas even if for the country as a whole poverty will increase significantly due to the large share of rice in the household consumption budget.

Suggested Citation

  • Coulombe, Harold & Wodon, Quentin, 2008. "Assessing the geographic impact of higher food prices in Guinea," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4743, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4743
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Demombynes, Gabriel & Elbers, Chris & Lanjouw, Jenny & Lanjouw, Peter & Mistiaen, Johan & Ozler, Berk, 2002. "Producing an Improved Geographic Profile of Poverty: Methodology and Evidence from Three Developing Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 039, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Chris Elbers & Jean O. Lanjouw & Peter Lanjouw, 2003. "Micro--Level Estimation of Poverty and Inequality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(1), pages 355-364, January.
    3. Christopher B. Barrett & Paul A. Dorosh, 1996. "Farmers' Welfare and Changing Food Prices: Nonparametric Evidence from Rice in Madagascar," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 656-669.
    4. Budd, John W, 1993. "Changing Food Prices and Rural Welfare: A Nonparametric Examination of the Cote d'Ivoire," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(3), pages 587-603, April.
    5. Tara Bedi & Aline Coudouel & Kenneth Simler, 2007. "More Than a Pretty Picture : Using Poverty Maps to Design Better Policies and Interventions," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6800.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rodriguez-Takeuchi, Laura & Imai, Katsushi S., 2013. "Food price surges and poverty in urban Colombia: New evidence from household survey data," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 227-236.
    2. Quentin Wodon, 2012. "Improving the Targeting of Social Programs in Ghana," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13082.
    3. repec:wbk:wbpubs:13081 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Backiny-Yetna, Prospère & Wodon, Quentin, 2010. "Pauvreté en Guinée de 1994 à 2007: Tendances, perceptions, et priorités des ménages
      [Poverty in Guinea from 1994 to 2007: Trends, Perceptions, and Household Priorities]
      ," MPRA Paper 34380, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Rural Poverty Reduction; Population Policies; Small Area Estimation Poverty Mapping; Achieving Shared Growth;

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