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Estimating Returns to Higher Education: A Survey of Models, Methods and Empirical Evidence

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  • Abdoulaye Diagne
  • Bity Diene

Abstract

This paper presents a detailed review of the main microeconomic and macroeconomic principles used to measure returns to education. We are also interested in major problems we encountered in empirically applying these models. The change in returns to higher learning in Sub-Saharan education is compared with returns to other levels of education. A meta-analysis method is applied to the results of a series of works on returns to higher education in Sub-Saharan countries. Copyright 2011 , Oxford University Press.

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  • Abdoulaye Diagne & Bity Diene, 2011. "Estimating Returns to Higher Education: A Survey of Models, Methods and Empirical Evidence," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(suppl_3), pages -132, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:20:y:2011:i:suppl_3:p:-iii132
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    Cited by:

    1. Phyllis Mumia Machio, 2017. "Determinants of Neonatal and Under-five Mortality in Kenya: Do Antenatal and Skilled Delivery Care Services Matter?," Research Papers RP_340, African Economic Research Consortium.
    2. repec:afe:journl:v:20:y:2018:i:1:p:59-67 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ilya Prakhov, 2017. "Determinants of Expected Return on Higher Education in Moscow," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 1, pages 25-57.

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