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Determinants of Soviet Household Income

  • Kenneth Smith
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    World Values Survey data are used to examine household income in the Soviet Union. The data, gathered Summer/Fall 1990, provide a rare opportunity to empirically examine microeconomic factors influencing a Soviet household's position in the regional/national income distribution. The survey contains data - collected regionally - from the three Baltic republics, Belarus, and the Moscow region. The data indicate certain patterns that existed and determined Soviet household income though there are often considerable regional variations. Further, there are marked differences between income distribution determinants in the Soviet Union and the U.S. and West Germany though similarities exist as well.

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    Article provided by Cattaneo University (LIUC) in its journal The European Journal of Comparative Economics.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 1 (June)
    Pages: 3-24

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    Handle: RePEc:liu:liucej:v:4:y:2007:i:1:p:3-24
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    1. Charles Kroncke & Kenneth Smith, 1999. "The wage effects of ethnicity in Estonia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 7(1), pages 179-199, March.
    2. Andrew Newell & Barry Reilly, 1999. "Rates of Return to Educational Qualifications in the Transitional Economies," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 67-84.
    3. Orazem, Peter & Vodopivec, Milan, 1995. "Winners and Losers in Transition: Returns to Education, Experience, and Gender in Slovenia," Staff General Research Papers 5270, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Krueger, Alan B. & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 1992. "A comparative analysis of East and West German labor markets before and after unification," ZEW Discussion Papers 92-11, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    5. Kenneth Smith, 2001. "Age/Earnings Profiles in Transition Economies: The Estonian Case," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 485-503.
    6. Kim, Byung-Yeon, 1999. "The Income, Savings, and Monetary Overhang of Soviet Households," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 644-668, December.
    7. Flanagan, Robert J., 1998. "Were communists good human capitalists? The case of the Czech Republic," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 295-312, September.
    8. Bergson, Abram, 1984. "Income Inequality under Soviet Socialism," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(3), pages 1052-99, September.
    9. Richard B. Freeman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1995. "Differences and Changes in Wage Structures," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number free95-1, December.
    10. Byung Yeon Kim, 1997. "Soviet Household Saving Function," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 181-203, May.
    11. Ronald Oaxaca, 1971. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," Working Papers 396, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    12. Newell, Andrew & Reilly, Barry, 1997. "Rates of Return to Educational Qualifications in the Transitional Economies," Discussion Papers in Economics 03/97, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    13. James K. Galbraith & Ludmila Krytynskaia & Qifei Wang, 2004. "The Experience of Rising Inequality in Russia and China during the Transition," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 1(1), pages 87-106, June.
    14. Jan Rutkowski, 1996. "High skills pay off: the changing wage structure during economic transition in Poland," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 4(1), pages 89-112, 05.
    15. Kenneth Smith, 2003. "Individual Welfare in the Soviet Union," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 64(1), pages 75-105, October.
    16. Brainerd, Elizabeth, 1998. "Winners and Losers in Russia's Economic Transition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1094-1116, December.
    17. Ofer, Gur & Pickersgill, Joyce, 1980. "Soviet Household Saving: A Cross-Section Study of Soviet Emigrant Families," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 121-44, August.
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