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Winners and Losers in Transition: Returns to Education, Experience, and Gender in Slovenia

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  • Orazem, Peter
  • Vodopivec, Milan

Abstract

This article, using an unusually rich data set on Slovenian workers over the 1987-91 period, explores changes in the structure of wages and employment produced by transition to a market economy. Employment and real wages fell dramatically over the period, but the losses were borne disproportionately by the least skilled. Across all sectors of the economy, relative wages and employment rose for the most-educated workers. Women gained in comparison with men, primarily because women occupied sectors less adversely affected by the transition. Pension policies, which encouraged retirement, are shown to have drastically reduced employment of experienced workers and helped contribute to rising returns to skill. Increases in returns to education and experience contributed to rising wage inequality, but the variance of wages increased for workers with identical skills as well. Copyright 1995 by Oxford University Press.
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Suggested Citation

  • Orazem, Peter & Vodopivec, Milan, 1995. "Winners and Losers in Transition: Returns to Education, Experience, and Gender in Slovenia," Staff General Research Papers Archive 5270, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:5270
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alan B. Krueger & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1995. "A Comparative Analysis of East and West German Labor Markets: Before and After Unification," NBER Chapters, in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 405-446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    5. repec:fth:prinin:307 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Alan Krueger & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1992. "A Comparative Analysis of East and West German Labor Markets: Before and After Unification," Working Papers 686, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    7. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-1381, September.
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