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Prostitution, hours, job amenities and education

Author

Listed:
  • Scott Cunningham

    () (Baylor University)

  • Todd D. Kendall

    () (Compass Lexecon)

Abstract

We analyze the relationship between education and criminal behavior based on a survey of nearly 700 North American female escorts who provide (typically illegal) prostitution services. Nearly 40% of the women in our sample report college completion. College-educated women are less likely to see clients in any given week and do not earn higher average hourly wages. However, conditional on seeing any clients, college-educated prostitutes see more clients and provide longer client sessions. We demonstrate that these results are consistent with a model in which college-educated prostitutes have better outside options to prostitution, but are also able to reduce the marginal disutility of prostitution work by attracting fewer unpleasant clients and by combining sexual services with non-sexual services such as companionship, where college education may be productive.

Suggested Citation

  • Scott Cunningham & Todd D. Kendall, 2017. "Prostitution, hours, job amenities and education," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 1055-1080, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11150-017-9360-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s11150-017-9360-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Prostitution; Labor supply; Human capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • Z18 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Public Policy

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