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What else can your payment card do? Multifunctionality of payment modes can reduce payment transparency

Author

Listed:
  • Rufina Gafeeva

    () (University of Cologne)

  • Erik Hoelzl

    () (University of Cologne)

  • Holger Roschk

    () (Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt)

Abstract

Abstract Payment modes (e.g., cash vs. credit card) vary in the transparency of the outflow of money. Smartcards (multifunctional cards), which bundle payment with non-payment functions (e.g., loyalty programs, identification, and other information functions), have become an increasingly popular payment mode. This shift toward multifunctionality in payment modes is assumed to reduce payment transparency and consequently to decrease consumers’ recall accuracy of past expenditures. We employ a field study to examine recall accuracy for recent purchases with cash, a single-function card, and a multifunctional card. We find that recall accuracy is lower when using a single- or a multifunction card than cash. We also find that it is not the multifunctionality of the card that results in a higher recall error but the individual usage patterns: A higher usage frequency of the non-payment functions results in a higher recall error.

Suggested Citation

  • Rufina Gafeeva & Erik Hoelzl & Holger Roschk, 2018. "What else can your payment card do? Multifunctionality of payment modes can reduce payment transparency," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 61-72, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:mktlet:v:29:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11002-017-9445-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s11002-017-9445-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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