IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/jtecht/v41y2016i6d10.1007_s10961-015-9442-7.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Innovation capacity in the healthcare sector and historical anchors: examples from the UK, Switzerland and the US

Author

Listed:
  • Helen Lawton Smith

    () (Birkbeck, University of London)

  • Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen

    (University at Buffalo, State University of New York)

  • Laurel Edmunds

    (University of Oxford)

Abstract

Abstract Innovation is an integral part of economic development in developed economies. In the post 2008 period, a key policy agenda is that of sustainable development, which calls for innovation in all aspects of value-chains. In this paper, we focus on innovation from the biotech—pharma perspective to see whether or not this will lead to a sustainable future for the regions where there are clusters of firms in this sector. We examine data from a recently completed European Union study of innovation in the Healthcare sector from the UK and Switzerland, countries with an historical base in pharma, to understand how innovation pathways vary at the regional level in the broader life sciences, which incorporate biotech and more. Innovation in the healthcare sector in two regions, Oxfordshire in the UK and Zurich in Switzerland are compared. We contextualize our discussion by drawing on studies that focus on the sector in the US, specifically Boston. The analytical framework comprises three elements: innovation systems and national and regional economic development theories are the first two, followed by approaches which consider organizational or institutional activity. This framework is used to help explain and understand the complexity of how innovation is organized at the sub-national level. The overall context is that it is increasing becoming a condition for government financing of research that it has more immediate application in industry or have the possibility of commercialisation (e.g., translational research).

Suggested Citation

  • Helen Lawton Smith & Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen & Laurel Edmunds, 2016. "Innovation capacity in the healthcare sector and historical anchors: examples from the UK, Switzerland and the US," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(6), pages 1420-1439, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:41:y:2016:i:6:d:10.1007_s10961-015-9442-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-015-9442-7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10961-015-9442-7
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Malerba, Franco, 2002. "Sectoral systems of innovation and production," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 247-264, February.
    2. Ron Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2011. "The emerging empirics of evolutionary economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 295-307, March.
    3. Bart Clarysse & Mike Wright & Els Van de Velde, 2011. "Entrepreneurial Origin, Technological Knowledge, and the Growth of Spin‐Off Companies," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48, pages 1420-1442, September.
    4. Helen Lawton Smith & Saverio Romeo & Shamistha Bagchi-Sen, 2008. "Oxfordshire biomedical university spin-offs: an evolving system," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 1(2), pages 303-319.
    5. Konishi, Hideo & Sandfort, Michael T., 2003. "Anchor stores," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 413-435, May.
    6. Goto, Akira, 2000. "Japan's National Innovation System: Current Status and Problems," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 103-113, Summer.
    7. Maureen McKelvey, 2004. "Evolutionary economics perspectives on the regional - national - international dimensions of biotechnology innovations," Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 22(2), pages 179-197, April.
    8. Helen Lawton Smith, 2003. "The biotechnology industry in Oxfordshire: enterprise and innovation," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(7), pages 985-1001, July.
    9. Freeman, Chris, 1995. "The 'National System of Innovation' in Historical Perspective," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 5-24, February.
    10. M. S. Gertler & Y. M. Levitte, 2005. "Local Nodes in Global Networks: The Geography of Knowledge Flows in Biotechnology Innovation," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 487-507.
    11. C. Autant-Bernard & V. Mangematin & N. Massard, 2006. "Creation of Biotech SMEs in France," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 173-187, March.
    12. Paul Tracey & Gordon Clark & Helen Lawton Smith, 2004. "Cognition, learning and European regional growth: an agent-centred perspective on the “new” economy," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 1-18.
    13. Asheim, Bjorn T. & Coenen, Lars, 2005. "Knowledge bases and regional innovation systems: Comparing Nordic clusters," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1173-1190, October.
    14. Jan Fagerberg & Maryann P. Feldman & Martin Srholec, 2014. "Technological dynamics and social capability: US states and European nations," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 313-337.
    15. Jong, Simcha & Slavova, Kremena, 2014. "When publications lead to products: The open science conundrum in new product development," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 645-654.
    16. Helen Lawton Smith & Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen, 2012. "The research university, entrepreneurship and regional development: Research propositions and current evidence," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(5-6), pages 383-404, June.
    17. Perkmann, Markus & Tartari, Valentina & McKelvey, Maureen & Autio, Erkko & Broström, Anders & D’Este, Pablo & Fini, Riccardo & Geuna, Aldo & Grimaldi, Rosa & Hughes, Alan & Krabel, Stefan & Kitson, Mi, 2013. "Academic engagement and commercialisation: A review of the literature on university–industry relations," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 423-442.
    18. Jong, Simcha, 2008. "Academic organizations and new industrial fields: Berkeley and Stanford after the rise of biotechnology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 1267-1282, September.
    19. Beth Perry & Tim May, 2007. "Governance, Science Policy and Regions: An Introduction," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(8), pages 1039-1050.
    20. Wintjes, Rene & Hollanders, Hugo, 2011. "Innovation pathways and policy challenges at the regional level: smart specialisation," MERIT Working Papers 027, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    21. Maryann Feldman, 2014. "The character of innovative places: entrepreneurial strategy, economic development, and prosperity," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 9-20, June.
    22. McKelvey, Maureen & Alm, Hakan & Riccaboni, Massimo, 2003. "Does co-location matter for formal knowledge collaboration in the Swedish biotechnology-pharmaceutical sector?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 483-501, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Biotech; Innovation; Regional development; Oxfordshire; Zurich; Boston;

    JEL classification:

    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:41:y:2016:i:6:d:10.1007_s10961-015-9442-7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.