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Does recession drive convergence in firms’ productivity? Evidence from Spanish manufacturing firms

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  • Álvaro Escribano

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  • Rodolfo Stucchi

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Abstract

This paper provides evidence on the effect of recessions and expansions on the productivity growth rate of productivity leaders and followers. We use data of a representative sample of the Spanish manufacturing sector for the period 1991 and 2005. These data allow us to estimate firm level productivity for a relatively long period of time and provide us with firm level perception of the business cycle. We find that productivity tends to converge in recessions because, in these periods, the productivity growth of followers is higher than the productivity growth of leaders. This fact is consistent with theoretical models of managerial incentives and competition. A recession can be seen as an exogenous increase in competition that reduces demand and poses a threat of liquidation. This threat is higher for followers and is high enough to create asymmetric incentives to become more productive. We test the robustness of our results to sample selection and different productivity measure. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Álvaro Escribano & Rodolfo Stucchi, 2014. "Does recession drive convergence in firms’ productivity? Evidence from Spanish manufacturing firms," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 339-349, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jproda:v:41:y:2014:i:3:p:339-349
    DOI: 10.1007/s11123-013-0368-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Moro, Alessio & Stucchi, Rodolfo, 2015. "Heterogeneous productivity shocks, elasticity of substitution and aggregate fluctuations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 45-53.
    2. Alex Coad, 2017. "Persistent heterogeneity of R&D intensities within sectors: Evidence and policy implications," JRC Working Papers on Corporate R&D and Innovation 2017-04, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    3. Morikawa, Masayuki, 2017. "Dispersion and Volatility of TFPQ in Service Industries," SSPJ Discussion Paper Series DP17-008, Service Sector Productivity in Japan: Determinants and Policies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Thanh Tam Nguyen-Huu & Minh Nguyen-Khac & Quoc Tran-Nam, 2017. "The role of environmental regulations and innovation in TFP convergence: Evidence from manufacturing SMEs in Vietnam," WIDER Working Paper Series 092, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Horta, Isabel M. & Camanho, Ana S., 2015. "A nonparametric methodology for evaluating convergence in a multi-input multi-output setting," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 246(2), pages 554-561.
    6. Sushanta K. MALLICK & Ricardo M. SOUSA, 2017. "The skill premium effect of technological change: New evidence from United States manufacturing," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 156(1), pages 113-131, March.
    7. Morikawa, Masayuki, 2017. "Impact of Foreign Tourists on Productivity in the Accommodation Industry : A panel data analysis," SSPJ Discussion Paper Series DP17-012, Service Sector Productivity in Japan: Determinants and Policies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    8. Coad, Alex, 2019. "Persistent heterogeneity of R&D intensities within sectors: Evidence and policy implications," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 37-50.
    9. Olson, Dennis & Zoubi, Taisier, 2017. "Convergence in bank performance for commercial and Islamic banks during and after the Global Financial Crisis," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 71-87.
    10. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2017. "Dispersion and Volatility of TFPQ in Service Industries," Discussion papers 17088, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity; Business cycle; Competition; Convergence; Recessions; Spain; D22; D24; E32; L25; L60; M20;

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • M20 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Economics - - - General

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