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Nonlinearities in Capital–Skill Complementarity

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  • Chris Papageorgiou
  • Viera Chmelarova

Abstract

This paper uses a novel dataset to test the capital–skill complementarity hypothesis in a cross-section of countries. It is shown that for the full sample there exists evidence in favor of the hypothesis. When we arbitrarily split the full sample into OECD and non-OECD countries, we find no evidence in favor of the hypothesis for the OECD subsample, but strong evidence for the non-OECD subsample. When we use Hansen’s [Econometrica 68 (2000) P. 576] endogenous threshold methodology we find that initial literacy rates and initial per capita output are threshold variables that can cluster countries into three distinct regimes that obey different statistical models. In particular, the regime with moderate initial per capita income but low initial education exhibits substantially higher capital–skill complementarity than the regime with low income and low education and the regime with high education. This cross-country nonlinearity in capital–skill complementarity is consistent with the time-series nonlinearity found by Goldin and Katz [Quarterly Journal of Economics 113 (1998) 693] using U.S. manufacturing data, and promotes the view that the phenomenon maybe a transitory one. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Chris Papageorgiou & Viera Chmelarova, 2005. "Nonlinearities in Capital–Skill Complementarity," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 55-86, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jecgro:v:10:y:2005:i:1:p:55-86
    DOI: 10.1007/s10887-005-1113-3
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Osipian, Ararat, 2007. "Экономический Рост: Образование Как Фактор Производства
      [Economic Growth: Education as a Factor of Production]
      ," MPRA Paper 7593, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Capolupo, Rosa, 2009. "The New Growth Theories and Their Empirics after Twenty Years," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 3, pages 1-72.
    3. Correa, Juan & Lorca, Miguel & Parro, Francisco, 2014. "Capital-Skill Complementarity: Does capital disaggregation matter?," MPRA Paper 61285, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Blackburn, Keith & Forgues-Puccio, Gonzalo F., 2007. "Distribution and development in a model of misgovernance," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(6), pages 1534-1563, August.
    5. Hikari Ban, 2010. "Factor Substitution and Relative Factor Prices," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 562-573, August.
    6. Markus Eberhardt & Francis Teal, 2011. "Econometrics For Grumblers: A New Look At The Literature On Cross‐Country Growth Empirics," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 109-155, February.
    7. Manuel A. Hidalgo Pérez & Jesús Rodríguez López & José Mª O.Kean Alonso, 2008. "Labor demand and information technologies: evidence for Spain, 1980-2005," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2008/13, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    8. Areendam Chanda & Beatrice Farkas, 2012. "Appropriate Technology, Human Capital and Development Accounting," Departmental Working Papers 2012-03, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    9. Michael STIMMELMAYR, "undated". "What Drives Wage Inequality?," EcoMod2008 23800137, EcoMod.
    10. Vito Pipitone & Luciano Seta, 2012. "The Conditional Convergence in TFP Levels. On the Relationship between TFP, Processes of Accumulation and Institutions," Working Papers - Economics wp2012_09.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    11. Galor, Oded, 2007. "Multiple growth regimes - Insights from unified growth theory," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 470-475, September.
    12. Daniel J. Henderson, 2009. "A Non-parametric Examination of Capital-Skill Complementarity," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(4), pages 519-538, August.
    13. Blackburn, Keith & Bose, Niloy & Emranul Haque, M., 2006. "The incidence and persistence of corruption in economic development," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 2447-2467, December.
    14. repec:eco:journ1:2017-04-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Osipian, Ararat, 2008. "Economic Growth—Human Capital Nexus in Post-Soviet Ukraine, 1989-2009," MPRA Paper 7731, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Christian Jaag, 2005. "The Role of Endogenous Skill Choice in an Aging Economy," Public Economics 0505005, EconWPA.
    17. M. Emranul Haque & Richard Kneller, 2007. "Business Cycle Synchronization of the Euro Area with the New and Negotiating Member Countries," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 92, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    18. Pablo-Romero, María del P. & Sánchez-Braza, Antonio, 2015. "Productive energy use and economic growth: Energy, physical and human capital relationships," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 420-429.
    19. Michael Stimmelmayr, 2009. "Wage Inequality in Germany: Disentangling Demand and Supply Effects," CESifo Working Paper Series 2802, CESifo Group Munich.

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