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A Conceptual Framework for Constructing a Corruption Diffusion Index

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  • Tomson Ogwang

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  • Danny Cho

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Abstract

In this paper, we propose a conceptual framework for constructing a diffusion index of changes in overall perceptions with respect to corruption. The corruption diffusion index we construct lies between 0 (the greatest overall deterioration in corruption perceptions) and 100 (the greatest overall improvement in corruption perceptions) with 50 (no change in corruption perceptions) as the critical reference. The proposed methodology is applied to the 2010/2011 global corruption barometer survey data. Possible refinements of the proposed methodology to capture the potentially multi-dimensional nature of corruption and the practical challenges associated with the empirical implementation are discussed. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Tomson Ogwang & Danny Cho, 2014. "A Conceptual Framework for Constructing a Corruption Diffusion Index," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 1-9, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jbuset:v:125:y:2014:i:1:p:1-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s10551-013-1904-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Birgit Burböck & Anita Macek & Mladen Vuckovic & Sonja Lipar & Stefan Bojnec, 2017. "Dark Friendliness in Austria and Slovenia," Management, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 12(4), pages 375-389.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption perception index; Global corruption barometer; Corruption diffusion index; C8;

    JEL classification:

    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs

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