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Is there a trade-off between income inequality and corruption? Evidence from Latin America

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  • Dobson, Stephen
  • Ramlogan-Dobson, Carlyn

Abstract

In contrast to other research, lower corruption is associated with higher income inequality. This result is consistent with the idea that the corruption-inequality relationship may be different where there is a large informal sector, as in Latin America.

Suggested Citation

  • Dobson, Stephen & Ramlogan-Dobson, Carlyn, 2010. "Is there a trade-off between income inequality and corruption? Evidence from Latin America," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 102-104, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:107:y:2010:i:2:p:102-104
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Albanesi, Stefania, 2007. "Inflation and inequality," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 1088-1114, May.
    2. Morley, Samuel A., 2000. "The effects of growth and economic reform on income distribution in Latin America," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    3. Kwabena Gyimah-Brempong, 2002. "Corruption, economic growth, and income inequality in Africa," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 183-209, November.
    4. Sanjeev Gupta & Hamid Davoodi & Rosa Alonso-Terme, 2002. "Does corruption affect income inequality and poverty?," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 23-45, March.
    5. Barro, Robert J, 2000. "Inequality and Growth in a Panel of Countries," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 5-32, March.
    6. Mattias Lundberg & Lyn Squire, 2003. "The simultaneous evolution of growth and inequality," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(487), pages 326-344, April.
    7. Alesina, Alberto & Angeletos, George-Marios, 2005. "Corruption, inequality, and fairness," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1227-1244, October.
    8. Bourguignon, Francois & Morrisson, Christian, 1998. "Inequality and development: the role of dualism," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 233-257.
    9. Kwabena Gyimah-Brempong & Samaria de Gyimah-Brempong, 2006. "Corruption, Growth, and Income Distribution: Are there Regional Differences?," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 245-269, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dimant, Eugen, 2014. "The Antecedents and Effects of Corruption - A Reassessment of Current (Empirical) Findings," MPRA Paper 60947, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Dobson, Stephen & Ramlogan-Dobson, Carlyn, 2012. "Why is Corruption Less Harmful to Income Inequality in Latin America?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1534-1545.
    3. Roy Cerqueti & Raffaella Coppier & Gustavo Piga, 2012. "Corruption, growth and ethnic fractionalization: a theoretical model," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 106(2), pages 153-181, June.
    4. repec:spr:annopr:v:243:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s10479-014-1567-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Tomson Ogwang & Danny Cho, 2014. "A Conceptual Framework for Constructing a Corruption Diffusion Index," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 1-9, November.
    6. Dobson, Stephen & Ramlogan-Dobson, Carlyn, 2012. "Inequality, corruption and the informal sector," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 104-107.
    7. Jiancai Pi & Yu Zhou, 2015. "The impacts of corruption on wage inequality and rural–urban migration in developing countries," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(3), pages 753-768, May.
    8. repec:spr:soinre:v:136:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1534-8 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption Latin America Income inequality Informal sector Panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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