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Inflation and Corruption Relationship: Evidence from Panel Data in Developed and Developing Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Hasim Akça

    (Çukurova University, Faculty of Economic and Administrative Sciences,Department of Finance, Adana, Turkey.)

  • Ahmet Yilmaz Ata

    (Gaziantep University, Faculty of Economic and Administrative Sciences,Department of Economics, Gaziantep, Turkey.)

  • Coskun Karaca

    (Cumhuriyet University, Faculty of Economic and Administrative Sciences,Department of Finance, Erzurum, Turkey.)

Abstract

Corruption, which is defined as the illegal and benefit-oriented usage of public power, is a fact that has an impact on the macro-economic performance of economy in the scope of cause and effect. Within this framework, there is a strong cause and effect interaction between inflation, an important economic parameter, and corruption. Inflation is defined as not only a financial factor results in corruption but also an economic problem results from corruption. With this particular study, the relationship between inflation and corruption was tried to be tested one-way. In this context, the impact of inflation, growth, trade gap, the quality of legislation, the efficacy of government, political stability and responsibility variables on corruption was tested through panel data method concerning to the 2011-2012 period of totally 97 countries from three different income-level group. It was found as a result of the empirical data that the inflation has a statistically significant and positive effect on corruption in all these 97 countries from three different income-level groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Hasim Akça & Ahmet Yilmaz Ata & Coskun Karaca, 2012. "Inflation and Corruption Relationship: Evidence from Panel Data in Developed and Developing Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 2(3), pages 281-295.
  • Handle: RePEc:eco:journ1:2012-03-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Haizhou Huang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2003. "Monetary Policies for Developing Countries; The Role of Corruption," IMF Working Papers 03/183, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Bryan W Husted, 1999. "Wealth, Culture, and Corruption," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 30(2), pages 339-359, June.
    3. Adnan Haider & Musleh ud Din & Ejaz Ghani, 2011. "Consequences of Political Instability, Governance and Bureaucratic Corruption on Inflation and Growth: The Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 50(4), pages 773-807.
    4. Pranab Bardhan, 1997. "Corruption and Development: A Review of Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1320-1346, September.
    5. T. S. Breusch & A. R. Pagan, 1980. "The Lagrange Multiplier Test and its Applications to Model Specification in Econometrics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 239-253.
    6. Al-Marhubi, Fahim A., 2000. "Corruption and inflation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 199-202, February.
    7. Miguel Braun & Rafael Di tella, 2004. "Inflation, Inflation Variability, and Corruption," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 77-100, March.
    8. Lambsdorff,Johann Graf, 2007. "The Institutional Economics of Corruption and Reform," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521872751, April.
    9. Hunter, John & Wu, Feng, 2014. "Multifactor consumption based asset pricing models using the US stock market as a reference: Evidence from a panel of developed economies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 557-565.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tomson Ogwang & Danny Cho, 2014. "A Conceptual Framework for Constructing a Corruption Diffusion Index," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 1-9, November.
    2. repec:gam:jecomi:v:5:y:2017:i:4:p:49-:d:122367 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; Panel Data;

    JEL classification:

    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • D40 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - General
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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