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Pollution Externalities in a Model of Endogenous Fertility and Growth

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  • Poul Schou

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Abstract

An endogenous growth model with human capital formation, pollution caused by production of consumption goods, and endogenous fertility decisions made by altruistic agents with infinite horizons is presented. Consequences for optimal policy of modelling fertility as an explicit decision variable are examined. Because ordinary lump-sum transfers to individuals are no longer neutral, either revenue from a pollution tax must be redistributed to dynasties (working as an implicit tax on child births), or lump-sum transfers must be supplemented with an explicit fertility tax. Alternatively, the government can avoid distortions of the fertility decisions by maintaining an appropriate public debt. When abatement is highly productive, it can be optimal to subsidize fertility in order to increase total production. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Suggested Citation

  • Poul Schou, 2002. "Pollution Externalities in a Model of Endogenous Fertility and Growth," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 9(6), pages 709-725, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:itaxpf:v:9:y:2002:i:6:p:709-725
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1020963114245
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Smulders, Sjak & Gradus, Raymond, 1996. "Pollution abatement and long-term growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 505-532, November.
    3. Lans Bovenberg, A. & Smulders, Sjak, 1995. "Environmental quality and pollution-augmenting technological change in a two-sector endogenous growth model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 369-391, July.
    4. Ehrlich, Isaac & Lui, Francis, 1997. "The problem of population and growth: A review of the literature from Malthus to contemporary models of endogenous population and endogenous growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 205-242, January.
    5. Raymond Gradus & Sjak Smulders, 1993. "The trade-off between environmental care and long-term growth—Pollution in three prototype growth models," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 25-51, February.
    6. Stokey, Nancy L, 1998. "Are There Limits to Growth?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(1), pages 1-31, February.
    7. Partha Dasgupta, 1995. "The Population Problem: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1879-1902, December.
    8. Harford, Jon D., 1997. "Stock Pollution, Child-Bearing Externalities, and the Social Discount Rate," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 94-105, May.
    9. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:scotjp:v:64:y:2017:i:3:p:263-282 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Dimitrios Varvarigos & Intan Zanariah Zakaria, 2011. "Growth and Demographic Change: Do Environmental Factors Matter?," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/46, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    3. Chen, Jhy-hwa & Shieh, Jhy-yuan & Chang, Juin-jen & Lai, Ching-chong, 2009. "Growth, welfare and transitional dynamics in an endogenously growing economy with abatement labor," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 423-437, September.
    4. Frederic Tournemaine & Pongsak Luangaram, 2012. "R&D, human capital, fertility, and growth," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 923-953, July.
    5. Frank Joest & Martin Quaas & Johannes Schiller, 2006. "Environmental problems and economic development in an endogenous fertility model," Working Papers 0428, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2006.
    6. Grimaud, Andre & Tournemaine, Frederic, 2007. "Why can an environmental policy tax promote growth through the channel of education?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 27-36, April.
    7. Furukawa, Yuichi & Takarada, Yasuhiro, 2013. "Technological change and international interaction in environmental policies," MPRA Paper 44047, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Per-Olov Johansson & Bengt Kriström, 2007. "On a clear day you might see an environmental Kuznets curve," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 37(1), pages 77-90, May.
    9. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2014. "Global Economic Growth and Environmental Change," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 64(3), pages 3-29, July-Sept.

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