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Differentiated Carbon Prices and the Economic Cost of Decarbonization

Author

Listed:
  • Florian Landis

    (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH))

  • Sebastian Rausch

    (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH)
    Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT))

  • Mirjam Kosch

    (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH))

Abstract

Employing a numerical general equilibrium model with multiple fuels, end-use sectors, heterogeneous households, and transport externalities, this paper examines three motives for differentiated carbon pricing in the context of Swiss climate policy: fiscal interactions with the existing tax code, non- $$\hbox {CO}_2$$ CO 2 related transport externalities, and social equity concerns. Interaction effects with mineral oil taxes reduce carbon taxes on motor fuels and transport externalities increase them. We show that the cost-effective overall carbon tax on motor fuels should be lower than the one on thermal fuels. This is found in spite of the fact that pre-existing taxes on motor fuels are well below our estimate of the transport externality per unit of transport fuel consumption. Differentiating taxes in favor of motor fuels yields only slightly more equitable incidence effects among households, suggesting that equity considerations play a minor role when designing differentiated carbon pricing policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Florian Landis & Sebastian Rausch & Mirjam Kosch, 2018. "Differentiated Carbon Prices and the Economic Cost of Decarbonization," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 70(2), pages 483-516, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:70:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10640-017-0130-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-017-0130-y
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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Abrell & Sebastian Rausch & Hidemichi Yonezawa, 2019. "Higher Price, Lower Costs? Minimum Prices in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 121(2), pages 446-481, April.
    2. Kalsbach, Oliver & Rausch, Sebastian, 2021. "Pricing carbon in a multi-sector economy with social discounting," ZEW Discussion Papers 21-060, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    3. Jan Abrell & Sebastian Rausch & Giacomo A. Schwarz, 2016. "Social Equity Concerns and Differentiated Environmental Taxes," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 16/262, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    4. Adriana Marcucci & Lin Zhang, 2019. "Growth impacts of Swiss steering-based climate policies," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 155(1), pages 1-13, December.
    5. Philippe Thalmann & Marc Vielle, 2019. "Lowering CO2 emissions in the Swiss transport sector," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 155(1), pages 1-12, December.
    6. Florian Landis, 2019. "Cost distribution and equity of climate policy in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 155(1), pages 1-28, December.
    7. Abrell, Jan & Rausch, Sebastian & Schwarz, Giacomo A., 2018. "How robust is the uniform emissions pricing rule to social equity concerns?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 783-814.
    8. Florian Landis & Adriana Marcucci & Sebastian Rausch & Ramachandran Kannan & Lucas Bretschger, 2019. "Multi-model comparison of Swiss decarbonization scenarios," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics, Springer;Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics, vol. 155(1), pages 1-18, December.

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