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Introduction to the Special Issue: Things We Do and Don’t Understand About the Household and the Environment

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  • Alistair Munro

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Suggested Citation

  • Alistair Munro, 2009. "Introduction to the Special Issue: Things We Do and Don’t Understand About the Household and the Environment," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 1-10, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:43:y:2009:i:1:p:1-10
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-009-9284-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anyck Dauphin & Abdel‐Rahmen El Lahga & Bernard Fortin & Guy Lacroix, 2011. "Are Children Decision‐Makers within the Household?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(553), pages 871-903, June.
    2. Ian Bateman & Alistair Munro, 2005. "An Experiment on Risky Choice Amongst Households," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(502), pages 176-189, March.
    3. Valérie Lechene & Ian Preston, 2007. "Demand properties in household Nash equilibrium," IFS Working Papers W07/01, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    4. M. Browning & P. A. Chiappori, 1998. "Efficient Intra-Household Allocations: A General Characterization and Empirical Tests," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(6), pages 1241-1278, November.
    5. Apps,Patricia & Rees,Ray, 2009. "Public Economics and the Household," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521887878, March.
    6. Mark Dickie & Shelby Gerking, 2009. "Family Behavior: Implications for Health Benefits Transfer from Adults to Children," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 31-43, May.
    7. V. Smith & George Van Houtven, 2004. "Recovering Hicksian Consumer Surplus within a Collective Model: Hausman's Method for the Household," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(2), pages 153-167, June.
    8. Shelly Lundberg & Jennifer Romich & Kwok Tsang, 2009. "Decision-making by children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 1-30, March.
    9. Dupont, Diane P., 2004. "Do children matter? An examination of gender differences in environmental valuation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 273-286, July.
    10. William T. Harbaugh & Kate Krause & Timothy R. Berry, 2001. "GARP for Kids: On the Development of Rational Choice Behavior," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1539-1545, December.
    11. Manuel Frondel & Colin Vance, 2009. "Do High Oil Prices Matter? Evidence on the Mobility Behavior of German Households," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 81-94, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Longhi, Simonetta, 2013. "Individual pro-environmental behaviour in the household context," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Ahlheim, Michael & Schneider, Friedrich, 2013. "Considering household size in contingent valuation studies," MPRA Paper 62898, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Lisa A. Robinson & James K. Hammitt, 2013. "Behavioral economics and the conduct of benefit–cost analysis: towards principles and standards," Chapters,in: Principles and Standards for Benefit–Cost Analysis, chapter 10, pages 317-363 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2014. "Environmental Dynamics in an Integrated Walrasian-General Equilibrium and Neoclassical-Growth Theory," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(3), pages 51-80, September.
    5. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2017. "Economic Development and Environmental Change with Endogenous Birth and Mortality Rates," Asian Journal of Economic Modelling, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(1), pages 77-97, March.
    6. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2013. "Dynamic Interactions among Growth, Environmental Change, Habit Formation, and Preference Change," The International Journal of Economic Behavior - IJEB, Faculty of Business and Administration, University of Bucharest, vol. 3(1), pages 3-25, December.
    7. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2014. "Global Economic Growth and Environmental Change," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 64(3), pages 3-29, July-Sept.
    8. Achtnicht, Martin, 2011. "Do environmental benefits matter? Evidence from a choice experiment among house owners in Germany," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 2191-2200, September.
    9. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2015. "Oscillations in a Growth Model with Capital, Technology and Environment with Exogenous Shocks," Academicus International Scientific Journal, Entrepreneurship Training Center Albania, issue 12, pages 73-93, July.
    10. Vikki O’Neill & Stephane Hess, 2014. "Heterogeneity assumptions in the specification of bargaining models: a study of household level trade-offs between commuting time and salary," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 745-763, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household; Environmental economics; Unitary model; Children; Stated preference; C920; D130; D80;

    JEL classification:

    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General

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