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Individual pro-environmental behaviour in the household context

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  • Longhi, Simonetta

Abstract

This paper exploits a new large data source on environmental behaviours and attitudes of people living in the UK to analyse to what extent the household context affects pro- environmental behaviours at the individual and household levels. The results suggest that singles and people living in couples without children have higher pro-environmental behaviour than people living in couples with children. Individual pro-environmental behaviour is affected by partner’s attitudes and behaviours, and both partners are equally relevant for household decisions. The results also show a positive correlation between concerns about the environment and pro-environmental behaviours.

Suggested Citation

  • Longhi, Simonetta, 2013. "Individual pro-environmental behaviour in the household context," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-21, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2013-21
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2013-21.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pettifor, Hazel, 2012. "Patterns of household practice: an examination into the relationship between housework and waste separation for households in the United Kingdom," ISER Working Paper Series 2012-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Alistair Munro, 2009. "Introduction to the Special Issue: Things We Do and Don’t Understand About the Household and the Environment," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(1), pages 1-10, May.
    3. Glaeser, Edward L. & Kahn, Matthew E., 2010. "The greenness of cities: Carbon dioxide emissions and urban development," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 404-418, May.
    4. Anyck Dauphin & Abdel‐Rahmen El Lahga & Bernard Fortin & Guy Lacroix, 2011. "Are Children Decision‐Makers within the Household?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(553), pages 871-903, June.
    5. M. Browning & P. A. Chiappori, 1998. "Efficient Intra-Household Allocations: A General Characterization and Empirical Tests," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(6), pages 1241-1278, November.
    6. Elizabeth Shove, 2010. "Beyond the ABC: climate change policy and theories of social change," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 42(6), pages 1273-1285, June.
    7. Chitnis, Mona & Sorrell, Steve & Druckman, Angela & Firth, Steven K. & Jackson, Tim, 2013. "Turning lights into flights: Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for UK households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 234-250.
    8. Druckman, Angela & Chitnis, Mona & Sorrell, Steve & Jackson, Tim, 2011. "Missing carbon reductions? Exploring rebound and backfire effects in UK households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3572-3581, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ivlevs, Artjoms, 2017. "Adverse Welfare Shocks and Pro-Environmental Behaviour: Evidence from the Global Economic Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 11133, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Artjoms Ivlevs, 2017. "Adverse Welfare Shocks and Pro-Environmental Behaviour: Evidence from the Global Economic Crisis," Working Papers id:12260, eSocialSciences.
    3. Longhi, Simonetta, 2015. "Residential energy expenditures and the relevance of changes in household circumstances," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 440-450.
    4. Longhi, Simonetta, 2014. "Residential energy use and the relevance of changes in household circumstances," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-22, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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