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Intertemporal data and travel cost analysis

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  • Daniel Hellerstein

Abstract

This paper considers the use of multi-year data in travel cost analysis. To exploit the information embedded within intertemporal data, two broad approaches are examined: multiple year cross sections and panel models. Multiple year cross sections can be used to detect trends, and to test for stability of behavior. Panel models can be used to control for unobservable factors that are individual specific. Unfortunately, the low intertemporal variability of travel cost data sets weakens the power of panel estimators. Using aggregate data from the Boundary Waters Canoe Area, the stability of demand processes over the 1980–1986 period is investigated, as well as the problems inherent in using panel estimators in travel cost analysis. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Hellerstein, 1993. "Intertemporal data and travel cost analysis," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 3(2), pages 193-207, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:3:y:1993:i:2:p:193-207
    DOI: 10.1007/BF00338785
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey Englin & Trudy Cameron, 1996. "Augmenting travel cost models with contingent behavior data," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(2), pages 133-147, March.
    2. Salvador Barrios & J. Nicolás Ibañez Rivas, 2014. "Climate Amenities and Adaptation to Climate Change: A Hedonic-Travel Cost Approach for Europe," Working Papers 2014.20, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Starbuck, C.M.C. Meghan & Alexander, Susan J. & Berrens, Robert P. & Bohara, Alok K., 2004. "Valuing special forest products harvesting:: a two-step travel cost recreation demand analysis," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 37-53, May.
    4. Salvador Barrios & J. Ibañez, 2015. "Time is of the essence: adaptation of tourism demand to climate change in Europe," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 132(4), pages 645-660, October.
    5. Salvador Barrios & Juan Nicolas Ibañez Rivas, 2013. "Tourism demand, climatic conditions and transport costs: an integrated analysis for EU regions," JRC Working Papers JRC80898, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

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