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Environmental and Social Accounting for Brazil

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  • Manfred Lenzen

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  • Roberto Schaeffer

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Abstract

An environmentally extendedSocial Accounting Matrix (SAM) has beenconstructed for Brazil for the first time. Wereview in detail previous studies in thisfield, describe the construction, structure anddata sources of the Brazilian SAM, anddemonstrate the effect of system closure.Examining a range of type-I and type-IImultipliers, we show that incomes generated byfinal consumption are highly skewed towardsrich households, but energy requirements andcarbon emissions are higher for the consumptionof the poor. A significant negative correlationexists between employment and income on onehand, and energy requirements and carbonemissions on the other, while a significantpositive correlation exists between imports,and energy and carbon. These correlationsdemonstrate that there is scope for policiesthat pursue imports substitution and reduceenergy consumption and carbon emissions whilstincreasing employment and income. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Suggested Citation

  • Manfred Lenzen & Roberto Schaeffer, 2004. "Environmental and Social Accounting for Brazil," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 27(2), pages 201-226, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:27:y:2004:i:2:p:201-226
    DOI: 10.1023/B:EARE.0000017281.24020.49
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Claudio Socci & Maurizio Ciaschini & Andrea Karim El Meligi, 2014. "CO2 emissions and value added change: assessing the trade-off through the macro multiplier approach," ECONOMICS AND POLICY OF ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2014(2), pages 49-74.
    2. Pereira Jr., Amaro Olimpio & Soares, Jeferson Borghetti & de Oliveira, Ricardo Gorini & de Queiroz, Renato Pinto, 2008. "Energy in Brazil: Toward sustainable development?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 73-83, January.
    3. Faße, Anja & Winter, Etti & Grote, Ulrike, 2014. "Bioenergy and rural development: The role of agroforestry in a Tanzanian village economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 155-166.
    4. Dario Debowicz, 2016. "A social accounting matrix for Iraq," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 5(1), pages 1-19, December.
    5. Alvaro Gallardo & Cristian Mardones, 2013. "Environmentally extended social accounting matrix for Chile," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 1099-1127, August.

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