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Industrial Pollution Linkages in North America: A Linear Analysis


  • Kenneth Reinert
  • David Roland-Holst


In recent years, a surge of interest in the linkages between trade and the environment has occurred in the contexts of both regional and multilateral trade agreements. In this paper, we utilize a three-country, social accounting matrix (SAM) of the North American economy and data from the World Bank's Industrial Pollution Projection System (IPPS) to conduct a linear multiplier analysis of industrial pollution linkages in North America. We provide estimates of both direct and indirect inter-country effects for a detailed set of industrial pollutants. The strongest linkages occur in the petroleum, chemicals, paper, base metals, and transportation equipment sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth Reinert & David Roland-Holst, 2001. "Industrial Pollution Linkages in North America: A Linear Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 197-208.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:13:y:2001:i:2:p:197-208 DOI: 10.1080/09537320120052461

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los, 1998. "Structural Decomposition Techniques: Sense and Sensitivity," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 307-324.
    2. Mette Wier, 1998. "Sources of Changes in Emissions from Energy: A Structural Decomposition Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 99-112.
    3. de Haan, Mark & Keuning, Steven J, 1996. "Taking the Environment into Account: The NAMEA Approach," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 42(2), pages 131-148, June.
    4. Henrik Jacobsen, 2000. "Energy Demand, Structural Change and Trade: A Decomposition Analysis of the Danish Manufacturing Industry," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 319-343.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shigemi Kagawa & Hajime Inamura & Yuichi Moriguchi, 2002. "The Invisible Multipliers of Joint-products," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 185-203, June.
    2. Tarancon, Miguel Angel & Del Río, Pablo, 2012. "Assessing energy-related CO2 emissions with sensitivity analysis and input-output techniques," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 161-170.
    3. Erik Dietzenbacher, 2002. "Interregional Multipliers: Looking Backward, Looking Forward," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 125-136.
    4. Finn Tarp & David Roland-Holst & John Rand, 2002. "Trade and Income Growth in Vietnam: Estimates from a New Social Accounting Matrix," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 157-184, June.
    5. Alcántara, Vicent & Padilla, Emilio, 2009. "Input-output subsystems and pollution: An application to the service sector and CO2 emissions in Spain," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 905-914, January.
    6. Tarancón Morán, Miguel Ángel & del Ri­o, Pablo & Albiñana, Fernando Callejas, 2008. "Tracking the genealogy of CO2 emissions in the electricity sector: An intersectoral approach applied to the Spanish case," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1915-1926, June.
    7. Matete, Mampiti & Hassan, Rashid, 2006. "Integrated ecological economics accounting approach to evaluation of inter-basin water transfers: An application to the Lesotho Highlands Water Project," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 246-259, November.
    8. Wiedmann, Thomas & Lenzen, Manfred & Turner, Karen & Barrett, John, 2007. "Examining the global environmental impact of regional consumption activities -- Part 2: Review of input-output models for the assessment of environmental impacts embodied in trade," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 15-26, February.


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