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When and How to Imitate Your Neighbours: Lessons from and for FEARLUS

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Abstract

This paper summarises some previously published work on imitation, experimentation (or innovation) and aspiration thresholds using the FEARLUS modelling system and reports new work with FEARLUS extending these studies. Results are discussed in the context of existing literature on imitation and innovation in related contexts. A form of imitation in which land uses are selected on the criterion of their recent performance within the neighbourhood of the land parcel concerned (called here 'Best-mean Imitation'), outperforms comparably simple forms of imitation in a wide range of FEARLUS Environments. However, the choice of criterion is shown to interact with both the way the criterion is applied, and the land manager's aspiration threshold: the level of return with which they are satisfied. The implications of work with FEARLUS for the broader bodies of research discussed, and vice versa, are considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas M. Gotts & J. Gary Polhill, 2009. "When and How to Imitate Your Neighbours: Lessons from and for FEARLUS," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 12(3), pages 1-2.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:2007-62-3
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    File URL: http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/12/3/2/2.pdf
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    11. Jager, W. & Janssen, M. A. & De Vries, H. J. M. & De Greef, J. & Vlek, C. A. J., 2000. "Behaviour in commons dilemmas: Homo economicus and Homo psychologicus in an ecological-economic model," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 357-379, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fraser J. Morgan & Philip Brown & Adam J. Daigneault, 2015. "Simulation vs. Definition: Differing Approaches to Setting Probabilities for Agent Behaviour," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-24, September.
    2. Laura Schmitt Olabisi & Ryan Qi Wang & Arika Ligmann-Zielinska, 2015. "Why Don’t More Farmers Go Organic? Using A Stakeholder-Informed Exploratory Agent-Based Model to Represent the Dynamics of Farming Practices in the Philippines," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-24, October.
    3. repec:eee:ecomod:v:229:y:2012:i:c:p:16-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Malawska, Anna & Topping, Christopher John, 2016. "Evaluating the role of behavioral factors and practical constraints in the performance of an agent-based model of farmer decision making," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 136-146.

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