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This is what the leading indicators lead

  • Maximo Camacho

    (Universidad de Murcia, Facultad de Economia y Empresa, 30100, Murcia, Spain)

  • Gabriel Perez-Quiros

    (Oficina de Estudios Monetarios y Financieros, Unidad de Investigacion, Servicio de Estudios, Banco de Espana, Alcala 50, 28014 Madrid, Spain)

We propose an optimal filter to transform the Conference Board Composite Leading Index (CLI) into recession probabilities in the US economy. We also analyse the CLI's accuracy at anticipating US output growth. We compare the predictive performance of linear, VAR extensions of smooth transition regression and switching regimes, probit, non-parametric models and conclude that a combination of the switching regimes and non-parametric forecasts is the best strategy at predicting both the NBER business cycle schedule and GDP growth. This confirms the usefulness of CLI, even in a real-time analysis. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Applied Econometrics.

Volume (Year): 17 (2002)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 61-80

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Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:17:y:2002:i:1:p:61-80
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  1. Birchenhall, Chris R & Osborn, Denise R & Sensier, Marianne, 2001. "Predicting UK Business Cycle Regimes," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(2), pages 179-95, May.
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  10. Arturo Estrella & Frederic S. Mishkin, 1998. "Predicting U.S. Recessions: Financial Variables As Leading Indicators," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 45-61, February.
  11. Li, David T & Dorfman, Jeffrey H, 1996. "Predicting Turning Points through the Integration of Multiple Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 14(4), pages 421-28, October.
  12. Andrew J. Filardo, 1999. "How reliable are recession prediction models?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 35-55.
  13. Birchenhall, Chris R, et al, 1999. "Predicting U.S. Business-Cycle Regimes," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(3), pages 313-23, July.
  14. Hess, Gregory D & Iwata, Shigeru, 1997. "Measuring and Comparing Business-Cycle Features," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(4), pages 432-44, October.
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  16. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1993. "A Procedure for Predicting Recessions with Leading Indicators: Econometric Issues and Recent Experience," NBER Chapters, in: Business Cycles, Indicators and Forecasting, pages 95-156 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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