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The determinants of housework time

Author

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  • Leslie S. Stratton

    (Virginia Commonwealth University, USA, and IZA, Germany)

Abstract

The time household members in industrialized countries spend on housework and shopping is substantial, amounting on average to about half as much time as is spent on paid employment. Women bear the brunt of this burden, a difference that is driven in part by the gender differential in wages. Efforts to reduce the gender wage gap and alter gendered norms of behavior should reduce the gender bias in household production time and reduce inefficiency in home production. Policymakers should also note the impact of tax policy on housework time and consider ways to reduce the distortions caused by sales and income taxes.

Suggested Citation

  • Leslie S. Stratton, 2015. "The determinants of housework time," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 133-133, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izawol:journl:y:2015:n:133
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Leslie S. Stratton, 2012. "The Role of Preferences and Opportunity Costs in Determining the Time Allocated to Housework," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 606-611, May.
    2. Michael Burda & Daniel Hamermesh & Philippe Weil, 2013. "Total work and gender: facts and possible explanations," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 239-261, January.
    3. Flipo, Anne & Fougere, Denis & Olier, Lucile, 2007. "Is the household demand for in-home services sensitive to tax reductions? The French case," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1-2), pages 365-385, February.
    4. Hirsch, Boris & Konietzko, Thorsten, 2013. "The effect of housework on wages in Germany : no impact at all," Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 46(2), pages 103-118.
    5. repec:iab:iabjlr:v:46:i:2:p:103-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Alan B. Krueger, 2007. "Are We Having More Fun Yet? Categorizing and Evaluating Changes in Time Alloction," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 38(2), pages 193-218.
    7. Jens Bonke & Mette Deding & Mette Lausten & Leslie S. Stratton, 2008. "Intra‐Household Specialization in Housework in the United States and Denmark," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 89(4), pages 1023-1043, December.
    8. Elena G. F. Stancanelli & Leslie S. Stratton, 2014. "Maids, Appliances and Couples' Housework: The Demand for Inputs to Domestic Production," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 81(323), pages 445-467, July.
    9. Kabátek, Jan & van Soest, Arthur & Stancanelli, Elena, 2014. "Income taxation, labour supply and housework: A discrete choice model for French couples," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 30-43.
    10. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2007. "Measuring Trends in Leisure: The Allocation of Time Over Five Decades," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 969-1006.
    11. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst & Loukas Karabarbounis, 2013. "Time Use during the Great Recession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(5), pages 1664-1696, August.
    12. Jan Kabatek & Arthur van Soest & Elena Stancanelli, 2014. "Income taxation, labour supply and housework: a discrete choice model for French couples," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00966801, HAL.
    13. Alexander M. Gelber & Joshua W. Mitchell, 2012. "Taxes and Time Allocation: Evidence from Single Women and Men," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(3), pages 863-897.
    14. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Leslie Stratton, 2010. "Examining the impact of alternative power measures on individual time use in American and Danish couple households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 325-343, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cristina Borra & Martin Browning & Almudena Sevilla, 2017. "Marriage and Housework," Working Papers 2017-049, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. J. Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & José Alberto Molina & Yu Zhu, 2018. "Intergenerational mobility of housework time in the United Kingdom," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 911-937, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    housework; gender; home production; tax policy;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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