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U.S. Monetary Policy’s impact on Latin America’s structure of production (1960-2010)

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  • Nicolás Cachanosky

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of U.S. monetary policy on Latin America’s production structure before two economic crises, specifically the effects of monetary policy on the real economy at the industrial level. Changes in the federal funds rate produce uneven effects on output trends across sectors and industries that are more capital-intensive and involved in relatively long-term projects are more sensitive to changes in the federal funds rate. Periods of loose monetary policy result in resource misallocation that is costly to correct during a bust if investment is irreversible, with a particular pattern of economic distortion during an unsustainable boom.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolás Cachanosky, 2015. "U.S. Monetary Policy’s impact on Latin America’s structure of production (1960-2010)," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 52(1), pages 95-116, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ioe:cuadec:v:52:y:2015:i:1:p:95-116
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    File URL: http://www.economia.uc.cl/docs/107764_laje_52195.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Guillermo A. Calvo & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2002. "Fear of Floating," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 379-408.
    2. Dixit, Avinash, 1991. "Irreversible Investment with Price Ceilings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 541-557, June.
    3. Carmen Reinhart & Guillermo Calvo & Leonardo Leiderman, 1992. "Capital Inflows to Latin America; The 1970's and the 1990's," IMF Working Papers 1992/085, International Monetary Fund.
    4. N. Cachanosky & P. Lewin, 2014. "Roundaboutness is Not a Mysterious Concept: A Financial Application to Capital Theory," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 648-665, October.
    5. Alejandro Jara & Ramon Moreno & Camilo E Tovar, 2009. "The global crisis and Latin America: financial impact and policy responses," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, June.
    6. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo & Leiderman, Leonardo, 1994. "Capital Inflows to Latin America: The 1970s and 1990s," MPRA Paper 8196, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. LAJE: U.S. Monetary Policy’s impact on Latin America’s structure of production (1960-2010)
      by Nicolas Cachanosky in Punto de Vista Economico on 2015-05-28 21:19:24

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    Cited by:

    1. Cachanosky, Nicolás & Lewin, Peter, 2016. "An empirical application of the EVA® framework to business cycles," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 60-67.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; Latin America; international business cycles; structure of production;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles

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