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Editorial —Marketing Science in Emerging Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Laxman Narasimhan

    () (PepsiCo, Purchase, New York 10577)

  • Kannan Srinivasan

    () (Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213)

  • K. Sudhir

    () (Yale School of Management, New Haven, Connecticut 06520)

Abstract

In this editorial accompanying the Special Section on Marketing Science in Emerging Markets (MSEM), we describe how research on emerging markets can contribute to richer theoretical and substantive understanding of markets and marketing. Such research can also aid in providing managerial guidance on how to operate in emerging markets. We conclude with a description of the selection and review process for the special section and an overview of the four papers being published.

Suggested Citation

  • Laxman Narasimhan & Kannan Srinivasan & K. Sudhir, 2015. "Editorial —Marketing Science in Emerging Markets," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 34(4), pages 473-479, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormksc:v:34:y:2015:i:4:p:473-479
    DOI: 10.1287/mksc.2015.0934
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mksc.2015.0934
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. K. Sudhir & Debabrata Talukdar, 2015. "The “Peter Pan Syndrome” in Emerging Markets: The Productivity-Transparency Trade-off in IT Adoption," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 34(4), pages 500-521, July.
    2. Grant Miller & A. Mushfiq Mobarak, 2015. "Learning About New Technologies Through Social Networks: Experimental Evidence on Nontraditional Stoves in Bangladesh," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 34(4), pages 480-499, July.
    3. William Jack & Tavneet Suri, 2014. "Risk Sharing and Transactions Costs: Evidence from Kenya's Mobile Money Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(1), pages 183-223, January.
    4. Yi Qian & Qiang Gong & Yuxin Chen, 2015. "Untangling Searchable and Experiential Quality Responses to Counterfeits," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 34(4), pages 522-538, July.
    5. K. Sudhir & Debabrata Talukdar, 2015. "The “Peter Pan Syndrome” in Emerging Markets: The Productivity-Transparency Tradeoff in IT Adoption," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1980, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    6. Aparajita Goyal, 2010. "Information, Direct Access to Farmers, and Rural Market Performance in Central India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 22-45, July.
    7. Kaifu Zhang, 2015. "Breaking Free of a Stereotype: Should a Domestic Brand Pretend to Be a Foreign One?," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 34(4), pages 539-554, July.
    8. Robert Jensen, 2007. "The Digital Provide: Information (Technology), Market Performance, and Welfare in the South Indian Fisheries Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 879-924.
    9. Yi Qian, 2008. "Impacts of Entry by Counterfeiters," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(4), pages 1577-1609.
    10. Yi Qian & Qiang Gong & Yuxin Chen, 2013. "Untangling Searchable and Experiential Quality Responses to Counterfeits," NBER Working Papers 18784, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Economides & Przemyslaw Jeziorski, 2014. "Mobile Money in Tanzania," Working Papers 14-24, NET Institute.
    2. Hermosilla, Manuel & Gutierrez-Navratil, Fernanda & Prieto-Rodriguez, Juan, 2017. "Can Emerging Markets Tilt Global Product Design? Impacts of Chinese Colorism on Hollywood Castings," MPRA Paper 82040, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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