IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Sequential macro-micro modelling with behavioural microsimulations


  • Jann Lay

    () (German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA), Hamburg, Germany and University of Göttingen, Germany)


This paper presents a sequential methodology that combines a macroeconomic CGE model with a behavioural microsimulation, illustrates the approach with applications, and discusses its merits and shortcomings. The microsimulation, based on a household income generation model, allows for incorporating individual fixed effects into macro-micro analysis. We argue that one of the main merits of the sequential approach is its flexibility. However, this flexibility comes at the cost of theoretical inconsistency.

Suggested Citation

  • Jann Lay, 2010. "Sequential macro-micro modelling with behavioural microsimulations," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 3(1), pages 24-34.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:3:y:2010:i:1:p:24-34

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ann Harrison, 2007. "Globalization and Poverty," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number harr06-1, January.
    2. Blundell, Richard & Macurdy, Thomas, 1999. "Labor supply: A review of alternative approaches," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 27, pages 1559-1695 Elsevier.
    3. Anne-Sophie Robilliard & Sherman Robinson, 2003. "Reconciling Household Surveys and National Accounts Data Using a Cross Entropy Estimation Method," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(3), pages 395-406, September.
    4. François Bourguignon & Anne-Sophie Robilliard & Sherman Robinson, 2003. "Representative versus real households in the macro-economic modeling of inequality," Working Papers DT/2003/10, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    5. Bussolo, Maurizio & Lay, Jann & van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique, 2006. "Structural change and poverty reduction in Brazil : the impact of the Doha Round," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3833, The World Bank.
    6. Cogneau, Denis & Robilliard, Anne-Sophie, 2000. "Growth, distribution and poverty in Madagascar," TMD discussion papers 61, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Denis Cogneau, 2001. "Formation du revenu, segmentation et discrimination sur le marché du travail d'une ville en développement : Antananarivo fin de siècle," Working Papers DT/2001/18, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    8. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4584 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Giulia Colombo, 2010. "Linking CGE and microsimulation models: a comparison of different approaches," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 3(1), pages 72-91.
    10. Creedy, John & Duncan, Alan, 2002. " Behavioural Microsimulation with Labour Supply Responses," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 1-39, February.
    11. Harrison, Glenn W. & Jones, Richard & Kimbell, Larry J. & Wigle, Randal, 1993. "How robust is applied general equilibrium analysis?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 99-115, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Maheshwar Rao & Robert Tanton & Yogi Vidyattama, 2013. "‘A Systems Approach to Analyse the Impacts of Water Policy Reform in the Murray-Darling Basin: a conceptual and an analytical framework’," NATSEM Working Paper Series 13/22, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
    2. van Ruijven, Bas J. & O’Neill, Brian C. & Chateau, Jean, 2015. "Methods for including income distribution in global CGE models for long-term climate change research," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 530-543.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:3:y:2010:i:1:p:24-34. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jinjing Li). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.