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Financing higher education: public choice and social welfare

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  • John Creedy

Abstract

This paper considers the use of fees versus the use of taxation for the finance of higher education in a framework that pays special attention to some of the interdependencies involved. In particular, the use of subsidies, in the form of a higher education grant to students, involves, via the government’s budget constraint, an increase in taxation. This increase in income taxation imposes an obvious burden on those who do not invest in higher education, but it is not a ‘free’ good from the point of view of the grant recipients who must pay higher taxes than otherwise during their working lives. This component of taxation may be called a deferred fee.

Suggested Citation

  • John Creedy, 1994. "Financing higher education: public choice and social welfare," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(3), pages 87-108, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:15:y:1994:i:3:p:87-108
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    File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/fs/articles/creedy_aug94.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-1093, Nov.-Dec..
    2. Julie Hope & Paul Miller, 1988. "Financing Tertiary Education: An Examination of the Issues," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 21(4), pages 37-57.
    3. Creedy, John & Francois, Patrick, 1990. "Financing higher education and majority voting," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 181-200, November.
    4. Lommerud, Kjell Erik, 1989. "Educational Subsidies When Relative Income Matters," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(3), pages 640-652, July.
    5. Arcelus, F J & Levine, A L, 1986. "Merit Goods and Public Choice: The Case of Higher Education," Public Finance = Finances publiques, , vol. 41(3), pages 303-315.
    6. Creedy, John & Francois, Patrick, 1993. "Voting over income tax progression in a two-period model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 291-298, February.
    7. John Creedy & Patrick Francois, 1992. "Higher Education and Progressive Taxation: Equity, Efficiency and Majority Voting," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 19(4), pages 17-30, September.
    8. Roberts, Kevin W. S., 1977. "Voting over income tax schedules," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 329-340, December.
    9. Lovell, Michael C, 1978. "Spending for Education: The Exercise of Public Choice," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(4), pages 487-495, November.
    10. Johnson, George E, 1984. "Subsidies for Higher Education," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(3), pages 303-318, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gemmell, Norman, 2017. "Reforms to New Zealand Superannuation Eligibility: Are They a Good Idea?," Working Paper Series 6556, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.

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