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Exploring Change in China’s Carbon Intensity: A Decomposition Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Kerui Du

    () (Center for Economic Research, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, China)

  • Boqiang Lin

    () (Collaborative Innovation Center for Energy Economics and Energy Policy, China Institute for Studies in Energy Policy, School of Management, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China)

  • Chunping Xie

    () (Birmingham Centre for Energy Storage, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK)

Abstract

This paper aims to explore the change of CO 2 intensity in China at both national and provincial levels. To serve this purpose, we introduce a decomposition model which integrates the merits of index decomposition analysis and production-theoretical decomposition analysis. Based on the decomposition, we also estimate the potential reduction of CO 2 intensity for China and its provinces. Using a panel data set including China’s 30 provinces during the period of 2006–2012, the empirical analysis is conducted and meaningful results are obtained. First, the potential energy intensity change was the dominant driving factor for the decrease of CO 2 intensity, which contributed to a total reduction of 19.8%. Second, the energy efficiency change and the CO 2 emission factor change also play positive roles in the CO 2 intensity reduction for most provinces. Third, provinces in the western area generally showed a relatively large potential reduction in CO 2 intensity, while those in the eastern area only demonstrated a small reduction.

Suggested Citation

  • Kerui Du & Boqiang Lin & Chunping Xie, 2017. "Exploring Change in China’s Carbon Intensity: A Decomposition Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-14, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:2:p:296-:d:90740
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    index decomposition analysis; production-theoretical decomposition analysis; China; carbon intensity;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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