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Decomposition of aggregate CO2 emissions within a joint production framework

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  • Zhang, Xing-Ping
  • Tan, Ya-Kun
  • Tan, Qin-Liang
  • Yuan, Jia-Hai

Abstract

We present an alternative decomposition technique to identify the factors which contribute to the change of aggregate CO2 emissions by using distance functions to model the joint production of desirable and undesirable outputs. The key feature of the proposed approach is the introduction of inputs/outputs factor efficiencies, specified as distance functions, to the decomposition model. By using the proposed approach, the components driving the change of CO2 emissions are decomposed into the contributors from nine factors specified in this paper, and several production technology related components are included. This paper applies the model to data from developing countries. For the 20 developing counties as a whole, empirical results indicate the economic (GDP) growth is the most important contributor to CO2 emission increase, while good output technical change is the most important component to CO2 emission reduction between 1995 and 2005. The empirical results also provide extensive insights into the components driving CO2 emissions for each country between 1995 and 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhang, Xing-Ping & Tan, Ya-Kun & Tan, Qin-Liang & Yuan, Jia-Hai, 2012. "Decomposition of aggregate CO2 emissions within a joint production framework," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1088-1097.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:34:y:2012:i:4:p:1088-1097
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2011.09.006
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ning Chang & Michael L. Lahr, 2016. "Changes in China’s production-source CO 2 emissions: insights from structural decomposition analysis and linkage analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(2), pages 224-242, June.
    2. Chen, Chien-Ming, 2013. "A critique of non-parametric efficiency analysis in energy economics studies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 146-152.
    3. repec:eee:transa:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:30-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:rensus:v:82:y:2018:i:p3:p:4100-4106 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Yue-Jun Zhang & Ya-Bin Da, 2013. "Decomposing the changes of energy-related carbon emissions in China: evidence from the PDA approach," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 69(1), pages 1109-1122, October.
    6. Zhang, Yue-Jun & Da, Ya-Bin, 2015. "The decomposition of energy-related carbon emission and its decoupling with economic growth in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1255-1266.
    7. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:5:p:685-:d:96774 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Xinlin Zhang & Yuan Zhao & Qi Sun & Changjian Wang, 2017. "Decomposition and Attribution Analysis of Industrial Carbon Intensity Changes in Xinjiang, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(3), pages 1-16, March.
    9. repec:eee:jrpoli:v:53:y:2017:i:c:p:77-87 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Kerui Du & Boqiang Lin & Chunping Xie, 2017. "Exploring Change in China’s Carbon Intensity: A Decomposition Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-14, February.
    11. Liobikienė, Genovaitė & Butkus, Mindaugas, 2017. "The European Union possibilities to achieve targets of Europe 2020 and Paris agreement climate policy," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 298-309.
    12. Zhang, Ning & Choi, Yongrok, 2013. "Total-factor carbon emission performance of fossil fuel power plants in China: A metafrontier non-radial Malmquist index analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 549-559.
    13. Wang, Miao & Feng, Chao, 2017. "Decomposition of energy-related CO2 emissions in China: An empirical analysis based on provincial panel data of three sectors," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 772-787.
    14. Yue-Jun Zhang & Zhao Liu & Huan Zhang & Tai-De Tan, 2014. "The impact of economic growth, industrial structure and urbanization on carbon emission intensity in China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 73(2), pages 579-595, September.
    15. Zhang, Xing-Ping & Zhang, Jing & Tan, Qin-Liang, 2013. "Decomposing the change of CO2 emissions: A joint production theoretical approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 329-336.
    16. Wang, Qunwei & Chiu, Yung-Ho & Chiu, Ching-Ren, 2015. "Driving factors behind carbon dioxide emissions in China: A modified production-theoretical decomposition analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 252-260.
    17. Sheinbaum-Pardo, Claudia, 2016. "Decomposition analysis from demand services to material production: The case of CO2 emissions from steel produced for automobiles in Mexico," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 245-255.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Decomposition analysis; CO2 emissions; Data envelopment analysis; Distance function;

    JEL classification:

    • C02 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Mathematical Economics
    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics

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