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The Diversity and Evolution Process of Bus System Performance in Chinese Cities: An Empirical Study

Author

Listed:
  • Xiaohong Chen

    () (The Key Laboratory of Road and Traffic Engineering, Ministry of Education, Tongji University, 4800 Cao'an Road, Shanghai 201804, China)

  • Xiang Wang

    () (The Key Laboratory of Road and Traffic Engineering, Ministry of Education, Tongji University, 4800 Cao'an Road, Shanghai 201804, China)

  • Hua Zhang

    () (The Key Laboratory of Road and Traffic Engineering of, Ministry of Education, Tongji University, RM 403 Building 3, Lane 46, Guokang Road, Shanghai 200092, China)

  • Jia Li

    () (The Key Laboratory of Road and Traffic Engineering, Ministry of Education, Tongji University, 4800 Cao'an Road, Shanghai 201804, China)

Abstract

Bus system performance varies from city to city, and experience clearly indicates that simply increasing the size of bus fleet cannot always improve bus system performance. It is therefore necessary to identify the major variables of bus system performance in different cities and implement a diversity improvement strategy based on actual problems that cities are facing. Two new indicators, annual average bus trips per capita and average daily ridership per bus, are proposed to respectively describe two aspects of bus system performance: willingness to travel and operational efficiency. According to these two indicators, 645 cities in China are classified into four types: cities with good performance in both aspects; in only one aspect; and in neither aspect. Then, based on panel data attained during 2002–2008, the impacts of the variables on willingness to travel and operational efficiency in different city types are analyzed by the variable coefficient model. The results show that the impacts of urban geography, economic conditions, and bus system facility vary among the four city types. Bus ownership ratio has a significant positive impact on improving willingness to travel for the cities with insufficient bus system facility. However, the impact decreases in the cities with well-developed facilities, whereas the operational efficiency suffers from negative impact due to the excess in bus system facility. In addition, the development characteristics of the cities that are improved both in willingness to travel and operational efficiency in each city type during 2002–2008 are discussed. The findings can help local governments make more specific, reasonable and efficient strategies to promote bus system performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaohong Chen & Xiang Wang & Hua Zhang & Jia Li, 2014. "The Diversity and Evolution Process of Bus System Performance in Chinese Cities: An Empirical Study," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(11), pages 1-17, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:6:y:2014:i:11:p:7751-7767:d:41978
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Wei Yu & Jun Chen & Xingchen Yan, 2019. "Space‒Time Evolution Analysis of the Nanjing Metro Network Based on a Complex Network," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(2), pages 1-17, January.
    2. Di Yao & Liqun Xu & Jinpei Li, 2019. "Evaluating the Performance of Public Transit Systems: A Case Study of Eleven Cities in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(13), pages 1-21, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bus system performance; diversity development strategy; bus service attraction; operation efficiency; pooled regression model;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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