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Interactions between Democracy and Environmental Quality: Toward a More Nuanced Understanding

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  • Katarzyna Iwińska

    () (Collegium Civitas, Pl. Defilad 1, 00-901 Warsaw, Poland)

  • Athanasios Kampas

    () (Department of Agricultural Economics & Rural Development, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 18855 Athens, Greece)

  • Kerry Longhurst

    () (Collegium Civitas, Pl. Defilad 1, 00-901 Warsaw, Poland)

Abstract

This paper seeks to contribute to existing debates on the relationship between democracy and environmental quality. More specifically, we aim to provide nuance and insight into the question as to whether democratic regimes are better equipped to protect the environment. After critically reviewing theoretical arguments and providing an overview of existing empirical studies, the paper proposes an approach which consists of the use of non-parametric correlations between democracy and environmental quality, and a consideration of the interactions between democracy, government effectiveness, economic prosperity, and perceptions of corruption. Crucially, we show that, although a positive correlation can be found between levels of democracy and environmental quality, the picture is somewhat blurred if data are stratified using criteria such as government effectiveness and corruption perceptions. Consequently, the main argument the paper pursues is that, to assess the relationship between democracy and environmental quality, intervening factors and their effects need to be acknowledged and taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Katarzyna Iwińska & Athanasios Kampas & Kerry Longhurst, 2019. "Interactions between Democracy and Environmental Quality: Toward a More Nuanced Understanding," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(6), pages 1-1, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:6:p:1728-:d:216158
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Wenwen & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2020. "Do country risks influence carbon dioxide emissions? A non-linear perspective," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 206(C).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    democracy index; environmental quality; non-parametric correlation; government effectiveness; corruption; economic prosperity; interaction effects;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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