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Modeling Acceptance of Electric Vehicle Sharing Based on Theory of Planned Behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Kai Zhang

    () (School of Law and Economic, China University of Political Science and Law, Beijing 100088, China)

  • Hongwei Guo

    () (School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China)

  • Guangzheng Yao

    () (College of Metropolitan Transportation, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124, China)

  • Chenggang Li

    () (School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China)

  • Yujie Zhang

    () (School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China)

  • Wuhong Wang

    () (School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China)

Abstract

The electric vehicle (EV) is a kind of innovation helping to address the issue of climate change and conventional energy consumption, compared to internal combustion engine vehicles. Electric vehicle sharing is a new way to promote the market penetration of electric vehicles due to its convenience and economy. Aiming to provide a more profound understanding of the influential factors in the acceptance of electric vehicle sharing, a structural equation model is proposed based on the theory of planned behavior as the policy environment has been added as prepositive variable. The data about the travelers’ perspective of electric vehicle sharing are acquired from questionnaires in Beijing. The results indicate that the perceived behavioral control is the primary factor with positive contributions to EV-sharing acceptance. Subjective norm, ranking second, is also proven to exert a significant positive effect on EV-sharing acceptance. The results also reveal the insignificant relationship between the attitude towards behavior and sharing acceptance, which is consistent with relevant research. Moreover, the significant positive effects of policy support on attitude and subjective norm are demonstrated. Finally, strategies to promote electric vehicle sharing are proposed, including providing more accessible resources (charging facility, service station), improving social pressure (free trial, sharing atmosphere), and strengthening policy support (financial support, legal guarantee). This study can give a better understanding of the acceptance of EV sharing and the strategy to promoting EV sharing in urban traffic.

Suggested Citation

  • Kai Zhang & Hongwei Guo & Guangzheng Yao & Chenggang Li & Yujie Zhang & Wuhong Wang, 2018. "Modeling Acceptance of Electric Vehicle Sharing Based on Theory of Planned Behavior," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(12), pages 1-14, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:12:p:4686-:d:189250
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ajzen, Icek, 1991. "The theory of planned behavior," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 179-211, December.
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    5. Kley, Fabian & Lerch, Christian & Dallinger, David, 2011. "New business models for electric cars--A holistic approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3392-3403, June.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Jesús García & Rosa Arroyo & Lidón Mars & Tomás Ruiz, 2019. "The Influence of Attitudes towards Cycling and Walking on Travel Intentions and Actual Behavior," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(9), pages 1-17, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    theory of planned behavior; electric vehicle; acceptance of sharing; structural equation model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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