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Bypassing the bust: the stability of upstate New York's housing markets during the recession

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  • Jaison R. Abel
  • Richard Deitz

Abstract

Over the past decade, the United States has seen real estate activity swing from boom to bust. But upstate New York has been largely insulated from this volatility, with metropolitan areas such as Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse even registering home price increases during the recession. An analysis of upstate housing markets over the most recent residential real estate cycle indicates that the region's relatively low incidence of nonprime mortgages and the better-than-average performance of these loans contributed to this stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaison R. Abel & Richard Deitz, 2010. "Bypassing the bust: the stability of upstate New York's housing markets during the recession," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 16(Mar).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednci:y:2010:i:mar:n:v.16no.3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Haughwout, Andrew & Peach, Richard & Tracy, Joseph, 2008. "Juvenile delinquent mortgages: Bad credit or bad economy?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 246-257, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Edward L. Glaeser & Charles G. Nathanson, 2014. "Housing Bubbles," NBER Working Papers 20426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Philip Arestis & Ana Rosa González-Martínez, 2015. "Is Job Insecurity a Driver of the Housing Cycle? Some Evidence in the Spanish Case," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 62(1), pages 1-14, March.
    3. Lu Han & William C. Strange, 2014. "Bidding Wars for Houses," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 42(1), pages 1-32, March.
    4. Philip Arestis & Ana Rosa González-Martínez, 2015. "Residential Construction Activity in OECD Economies," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(4), pages 451-474, July.
    5. Richard Deitz & Andrew F. Haughwout & Charles Steindel, 2010. "The recession's impact on the state budgets of New York and New Jersey," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 16(Jun/Jul).
    6. Michael Brocker & Christopher Hanes, 2014. "The 1920s American Real Estate Boom and the Downturn of the Great Depression: Evidence from City Cross-Sections," NBER Chapters,in: Housing and Mortgage Markets in Historical Perspective, pages 161-201 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Jaison R. Abel & Richard Deitz, 2012. "How severe was the credit cycle in the New York-northern New Jersey region?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 18(Nov).
    8. Han, Lu & Strange, William C., 2016. "What is the role of the asking price for a house?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 115-130.
    9. James A. Orr & John Sporn, 2012. "The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: a review of stimulus spending in New York and New Jersey," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 18(Sept).
    10. Glaeser, Edward L. & Nathanson, Charles G., 2015. "Housing Bubbles," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    11. Francisca Richter & Youngme Seo, 2011. "Inter-regional home price dynamics through the foreclosure crisis," Working Paper 1119, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

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