IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/voj/journl/v62y2015i1p1-14.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Is Job Insecurity a Driver of the Housing Cycle? Some Evidence in the Spanish Case

Author

Listed:
  • Philip Arestis

    () (University of Cambridge, UK)

  • Ana Rosa González-Martínez

    () (Cambridge Econometrics, UK)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to study a possible connection between the characteristics of the labour market, namely, employment protection and flexibility, and the dynamics of the housing market. More specifically, this contribu- tion analyses whether the poor quality of employment in a given economy could cause the collapse of the housing market and impairs its recovery. In the second stage of our analysis, we provide estimates for Spain over the period 1984-2014. In doing so, the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds test for cointegration is employed.\

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Arestis & Ana Rosa González-Martínez, 2015. "Is Job Insecurity a Driver of the Housing Cycle? Some Evidence in the Spanish Case," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 62(1), pages 1-14, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:voj:journl:v:62:y:2015:i:1:p:1-14
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.panoeconomicus.rs/casopis/2015_1/01%20Philip%20Arestis%20and%20Ana%20Rosa%20Gonzalez-Martinez.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Olga Alonso-Villar & Coral Del Rio, "undated". "The Geographical Concentration of Unemployment: a Male-female Comparison in Spain," Regional and Urban Modeling 283600002, EcoMod.
    2. Jaison R. Abel & Richard Deitz, 2010. "Bypassing the bust: the stability of upstate New York's housing markets during the recession," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 16(Mar).
    3. Laamanen, Jani-Petri, 2017. "Home-ownership and the Labour Market: Evidence from Rental Housing Market Deregulation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 157-167.
    4. Dickey, David A & Fuller, Wayne A, 1981. "Likelihood Ratio Statistics for Autoregressive Time Series with a Unit Root," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(4), pages 1057-1072, June.
    5. James M. Poterba, 1984. "Tax Subsidies to Owner-Occupied Housing: An Asset-Market Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 99(4), pages 729-752.
    6. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    7. Sascha Becker & Samuel Bentolila & Ana Fernandes & Andrea Ichino, 2010. "Youth emancipation and perceived job insecurity of parents and children," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 1047-1071, June.
    8. Michele Belot & Jan Boone & Jan Van Ours, 2007. "Welfare-Improving Employment Protection," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 74(295), pages 381-396, August.
    9. Junsoo Lee & Mark C. Strazicich, 2003. "Minimum Lagrange Multiplier Unit Root Test with Two Structural Breaks," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 1082-1089, November.
    10. Gattini, Luca & Ganoulis, Ioannis, 2012. "House price responsiveness of housing investments across major European economies," Working Paper Series 1461, European Central Bank.
    11. Francisco Carballo-Cruz, 2011. "Causes and Consequences of the Spanish Economic Crisis: Why the Recovery is Taken so Long?," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 58(3), pages 309-328, September.
    12. Nelson, Charles R. & Plosser, Charles I., 1982. "Trends and random walks in macroeconmic time series : Some evidence and implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-162.
    13. Fella, Giulio, 2005. "Termination restrictions and investment in general training," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(6), pages 1479-1499, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour market; Housing cycle; Residential investment; Cointegra- tion techniques; Spain;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:voj:journl:v:62:y:2015:i:1:p:1-14. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ivana Horvat). General contact details of provider: http://www.panoeconomicus.rs/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.