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The Minimum Wage: Labor Market Consequences in the Czech Republic

This paper aims to quantify the impact of the minimum wage on labor market performance in the Czech Republic. Using regional data for 1995–2004, it estimates the effect of the minimum wage adjusted for the regional wage differential on regional unemployment. Consequently, using detailed individual data from 2004/2005, the authors analyze the annual hikes in the minimum wage, which allow them to estimate employment probabilities for workers with a wage level at, or close to, the new minimum wage. The aim is to reveal whether the most endangered groups of workers exhibited significantly different subsequent employment probabilities. The autors´ results reveal that the minimum wage has had a significant impact in terms of increasing regional unemployment and reducing the employment probabilities of low-paid workers.

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Article provided by Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences in its journal Finance a uver - Czech Journal of Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 59 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 255-274

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Handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:59:y:2009:i:3:p:255-274
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  1. Cahuc, P. & Michel, P., 1992. "Minimum Wage, Unemployment and Growth," Papiers d'Economie Mathématique et Applications 92.35, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  2. Mirco Tonin, 2009. "Minimumwage and tax evasion: theory and evidence," MNB Working Papers 2009/2, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (the central bank of Hungary).
  3. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & Thomas Lemieux & David N. Margolis, 1997. "Minimum Wages and Youth Employment in France and the United States," NBER Working Papers 6111, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Andrea Bassanini & Romain Duval, 2006. "Employment Patterns in OECD Countries: Reassessing the Role of Policies and Institutions," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 486, OECD Publishing.
  5. James B. Rebitzer & Lowell J. Taylor, 1991. "The Consequences of Minimum Wage Laws: Some New Theoretical Ideas," NBER Working Papers 3877, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Charles Brown & Curtis Gilroy & Andrew Kohen, 1982. "The Effect of the Minimum Wage on Employment and Unemployment: A Survey," NBER Working Papers 0846, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Acemoglu, Daron, 2001. "Good Jobs versus Bad Jobs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 1-21, January.
  8. Kertesi, Gabor & Köllő, János, 2003. "Fighting “Low Equilibria” by Doubling the Minimum Wage? Hungary’s Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 970, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David Margolis & Thomas Philippon, 1999. "Minimum Wages and Employment in France and the United States," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00370392, HAL.
  10. Kristensen, Nicolai & Cunningham, Wendy, 2006. "Do minimum wages in Latin America and the Caribbean matter ? Evidence from 19 countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3870, The World Bank.
  11. David Neumark & William Wascher, 1992. "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages: Panel Data on State Minimum Wage Laws," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 46(1), pages 55-81, October.
  12. Alan Manning, 1994. "How do we Know that Real Wages are Too High?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0195, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  13. Kamila Fialová & Ondrej Schneider, 2008. "Labour Market Institutions and their Effect on Labour Market Performance in the New EU Member Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 2421, CESifo Group Munich.
  14. Brown, Charles, 1999. "Minimum wages, employment, and the distribution of income," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 32, pages 2101-2163 Elsevier.
  15. Tor Eriksson & Mariola Pytlikova, 2004. "Firm-level Consequences of Large Minimum-wage Increases in the Czech and Slovak Republics," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(1), pages 75-103, 03.
  16. Cubitt, Robin P & Heap, Shaun P Hargreaves, 1999. "Minimum Wage Legislation, Investment and Human Capital," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 46(2), pages 135-57, May.
  17. Brown, Charles & Gilroy, Curtis & Kohen, Andrew, 1982. "The Effect of the Minimum Wage on Employment and Unemployment," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 487-528, June.
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