IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/labour/v18y2004i1p75-103.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Firm-level Consequences of Large Minimum-wage Increases in the Czech and Slovak Republics

Author

Listed:
  • Tor Eriksson
  • Mariola Pytlikova

Abstract

After an initial decline in the level of real minimum-wage rates, there were series of unusually large increases in their levels - 70 and 50 per cent - during the years 1999-2002 in the Czech and Slovak Republics, respectively. Using information from matched employee-employer data sets, we look at the impact of minimum-wage hikes on both wages and employment. Our results suggest that there are some, but not substantial, job losses in reaction to minimum-wage hikes and that the impact on firm wages is rather large, implying that further increases of similar magnitude might very well have negative consequences for employment. Copyright 2004, CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Tor Eriksson & Mariola Pytlikova, 2004. "Firm-level Consequences of Large Minimum-wage Increases in the Czech and Slovak Republics," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(1), pages 75-103, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:18:y:2004:i:1:p:75-103
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=labr&volume=18&issue=1&year=2004&part=null
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. David Neumark & William Wascher, 2006. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Review of Evidence from the New Minimum Wage Research," NBER Working Papers 12663, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. International Monetary Fund, 2016. "Cross-Country Report on Minimum Wages; Selected Issues," IMF Staff Country Reports 16/151, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Kamila Fialová & Martina Mysíková, 2009. "The Minimum Wage: Labor Market Consequences in the Czech Republic," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 59(3), pages 255-274, August.
    4. Piotr Lewandowski & Agnieszka Kaminska, 2015. "The effects of minimum wage on a labour market with high temporary employment," IBS Working Papers 7/2015, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    5. Haroon Bhorat & Tara Caetano & Benjamin Jourdan & Ravi Kanbur & Christopher Rooney & Benjamin Stanwix & Ingrid Woolard, 2016. "Investigating the Feasibility of a National Minimum Wage for South Africa," Working Papers 201601, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    6. Goraus-Tanska, Karolina & Lewandowski, Piotr, 2016. "Minimum Wage Violation in Central and Eastern Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 10098, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Pantea, Smaranda, 2017. "Did minimum wage increases reduce employment? Panel data evidence from Romania," MPRA Paper 79863, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Sergey Kapelyuk, 2015. "The effect of minimum wage on poverty," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 389-423, April.
    9. Jan J. Rutkowski & Stefano Scarpetta, 2005. "Enhancing Job Opportunities : Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7408.
    10. Tor Eriksson & Mariola Pytliková & Frédéric Warzynski, 2013. "Increased sorting and wage inequality in the Czech Republic," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 21(2), pages 357-380, April.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:18:y:2004:i:1:p:75-103. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/csrotit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.