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The Life-cycle Impact of Alternative Higher Education Finance Systems in Ireland


    (University of Limerick, National University of Ireland, Galway)


    (Rural Economy and Development Programme Research Centre, Teagasc)

With increasing numbers of young people participating in higher education in Ireland and a heavy reliance of higher education institutions on State funding, the introduction of an alternative finance system for Ireland has been muted over the past number of years. However, no study has been conducted to gauge the potential impact of such measures. In this paper we utilise a dynamic microsimulation model developed for Ireland to simulate the impact of both an income contingent loan system (ICL) and a graduate tax system from a fiscal and redistributional viewpoint and to analyse the repayment length under the former system. Our results suggest that an ICL system could be more equitable, while the graduate tax system could be a better alternative from a fiscal viewpoint. The results also illustrate the importance of the interest rate attached to any future student loan system within Ireland from a fiscal viewpoint

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Article provided by Economic and Social Studies in its journal Economic and Social Review.

Volume (Year): 42 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 237–270

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Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:42:y:2011:i:3:p:237-270
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  1. Hryshko, Dmytro & Luengo-Prado, Maria Jose & Sørensen, Bent E, 2010. "Childhood Determinants of Risk Aversion: The Long Shadow of Compulsory Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 7999, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
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  7. Lorraine Dearden & Emla Fitzsimons & Alissa Goodman & Greg Kaplan, 2007. "Higher education funding reforms in England: the distributional effects and the shifting balance of costs," IFS Working Papers W07/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Cathal O'Donoghue & John Lennon & Stephen Hynes, 2009. "The Life-Cycle Income Analysis Model (LIAM): a study of a flexible dynamic microsimulation modelling computing framework," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 2(1), pages 16-31.
  9. Susan M. Dynarski, 2003. "Does Aid Matter? Measuring the Effect of Student Aid on College Attendance and Completion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 279-288, March.
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  11. Chapman, Bruce, 2006. "Income Contingent Loans for Higher Education: International Reforms," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
  12. Tim Callan & Tim Smeeding & Panos Tsakloglou, 2007. "Distributional Effects of Public Education Transfers in Seven European Countries," Papers WP207, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
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  14. Barr, Nicholas, 1993. "Alternative Funding Resources for Higher Education," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(418), pages 718-28, May.
  15. Enrico Moretti, 2002. "Estimating the Social Return to Higher Education: Evidence From Longitudinal and Repeated Cross-Sectional Data," NBER Working Papers 9108, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Migali, Giuseppe, 2006. "Funding Higher Education and Wage Uncertainty: Income Contingent Loan Versus Mortgate Loan," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 740, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  17. Colm Harmon & Hessel Oosterbeek & Ian Walker, 2000. "The returns to education : a review of evidence, issues and deficiencies in the literature," Open Access publications 10197/670, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  18. Bas Jacobs, 2002. "An investigation of education finance reform; graduate taxes and income contingent loans in the Netherlands," CPB Discussion Paper 9, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  19. Burdman, Pamela, 2005. "The Student Debt Dilemma: Debt Aversion as a Barrier to College Access," University of California at Berkeley, Center for Studies in Higher Education qt6sp9787j, Center for Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley.
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