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Politics and Social Partnership - Flexible Network Governance

  • Niamh Hardiman

    (University College Dublin)

This paper reassesses the relationship between social partnership and the broader Irish policy process. What has developed may be conceptualised as “flexible network governance”. While pay regulation may be less strongly institutionalised than in other countries with national-level pay deals, social partnership has created networks for establishing and maintaining priorities that matter to those involved in the process. These have not replaced conventional methods of developing policy. Nor do they displace government prerogative - politics can trump partnership. Social partnership is open to some criticism on grounds of both effectiveness and legitimacy. But is has proven robust to date on the core issues it deals with.

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File URL: http://www.esr.ie/Vol37_3/02%20Hardiman.pdf
File Function: First version, 2006
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Article provided by Economic and Social Studies in its journal Economic and Social Review.

Volume (Year): 37 (2006)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 343–374

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Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:37:y:2006:i:3:p:343-374
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  1. Wolfgang Streeck, 1995. "Works Councils in Western Europe: From Consultation to Participation," NBER Chapters, in: Works Councils: Consultation, Representation, and Cooperation in Industrial Relations, pages 313-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Nolan, Brian & Gannon, Brenda & Layte, Richard & Watson, Dorothy & Whelan, Christopher T. & Williams, James, 2002. "Monitoring Poverty Trends in Ireland: Results from the 2000 Living in Ireland survey," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS45.
  3. Lucio Baccaro, 2003. "What is Alive and What is Dead in the Theory of Corporatism," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(4), pages 683-706, December.
  4. Scharpf, Fritz W., 2000. "Institutions in comparative policy research," MPIfG Working Paper 00/3, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
  5. Patrick Honohan & Brendan Walsh, 2002. "Catching Up with the Leaders: The Irish Hare," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 33(1), pages 1-78.
  6. Gerry Boyle & Rory McElligott & Jim O'Leary, 2004. "Public-Private Wage Differentials in Ireland, 1994-2001," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n1421004, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
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