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What is Alive and What is Dead in the Theory of Corporatism

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  • Lucio Baccaro

Abstract

The term 'corporatism' simultaneously designates a particular interest group structure, characterized by monopolistic, centralized and internally non-democratic associations, and a particular policy-making process, also known as 'concertation' or 'social partnership'. This paper argues that structure and process may no longer be closely associated. By focusing on the Irish and Italian cases, it shows that concertation is perfectly compatible with a non-corporatist structure of the interest representation system. Inter- and intra-organizational co-ordination remains important for the viability of concertation. However, it can be achieved, even in relatively fragmented systems like the Irish and the Italian, through alternative mechanisms relying on democracy and discussion. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • Lucio Baccaro, 2003. "What is Alive and What is Dead in the Theory of Corporatism," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(4), pages 683-706, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:41:y:2003:i:4:p:683-706
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    Cited by:

    1. Niamh Hardiman, 2006. "Politics and Social Partnership - Flexible Network Governance," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(3), pages 343-374.
    2. Jesús Ferreiro & Carmen Gómez, 2014. "Implementing a Voluntary Wage Policy: Lessons from the Irish and Spanish Wages Policies before the Crisis," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 61(1), pages 107-127, Februar.
    3. Simon STURN, 2013. "Are corporatist labour markets different? Labour market regimes and unemployment in OECD countries," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 152(2), pages 237-254, June.
    4. Alexander Herzog-Stein & Fabian Lindner & Simon Sturn & Till van Treeck, 2010. "Vom Krisenherd zum Wunderwerk?," IMK Report 56-2010, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    5. Simon Sturn, 2011. "Labour market regimes and unemployment in OECD countries," IMK Working Paper 6-2011, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    6. Eduardo Zambrano, 2014. "A structuralist theory of central bank independence," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(4), pages 2190-2200.
    7. Hiroaki Richard Watanabe, 2015. "Neoliberal reform for greater competitiveness: labour market deregulation in Japan and Italy," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 54-76, January.
    8. van Treeck, Till. & Sturn, Simon., 2012. "Income inequality as a cause of the Great Recession? : A survey of current debates," ILO Working Papers 994709343402676, International Labour Organization.
    9. Avdagic, Sabina & Rhodes, Martin & Visser, Jelle, 2005. "The Emergence and Evolution of Social Pacts: A Provisional Framework for Comparative Analysis," European Governance Papers (EUROGOV) 1, CONNEX and EUROGOV networks.
    10. Barbara Vis & Jaap Woldendorp & Hans Keman, 2013. "Examining variation in economic performance using fuzzy-sets," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 1971-1989, June.
    11. Paul Teague & Jimmy Donaghey, 2009. "Why has Irish Social Partnership Survived?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 55-78, March.

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