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Governing the Irish Economy: A Triple Crisis

Author

Listed:
  • Sebastian Dellepiane

    (University of Antwerp)

  • Niamh Hardiman

    (University College Dublin)

Abstract

The international economic crisis hit Ireland hard from 2007 on. Ireland’s membership of the Euro had a significant effect on the policy configuration in the run-up to the crisis, as this had shaped credit availability, bank incentives, fiscal priorities, and wage bargaining practices in a variety of ways. But domestic political choices shaped the terms on which Ireland experienced the crisis. The prior configuration of domestic policy choices, the structure of decision-making, and the influence of organized interests over government, all play a vital role in explaining the scale and severity of crisis. Indeed, this paper argues that Ireland has had to manage not one economic crisis but three – financial, fiscal, and competitiveness. Initial recourse to the orthodox strategies of spending cuts and cost containment did not contain the spread of the crisis, and in November 2010 Ireland entered an EU-IMF loan agreement. This paper outlines the pathways to this outcome.

Suggested Citation

  • Sebastian Dellepiane & Niamh Hardiman, 2011. "Governing the Irish Economy: A Triple Crisis," Working Papers 201103, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201103
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/geary/static/publications/workingpapers/gearywp201103.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2011
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gerard Caprio & Patrick Honohan, 2008. "Banking Crises," Center for Development Economics 2008-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    2. Barrett, Alan & Bergin, Adele & Coleman, Kieran & McHale, John & Morgenroth, Edgar & Walsh, John R., 2005. "Budget Perspectives 2006," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BMI181 edited by Callan, Tim & Doris, Aedin.
    3. Niamh Hardiman, 2006. "Politics and Social Partnership - Flexible Network Governance," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 37(3), pages 343-374.
    4. Honohan, Patrick & Donovan, Donal & Gorecki, Paul & Mottiar, Rafique, 2010. "The Irish Banking Crisis: Regulatory and Financial Stability Policy," MPRA Paper 24896, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Sebastian Dellepiane Avellaneda & Niamh Hardiman, 2010. "The European Context of Ireland’s Economic Crisis," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41(4), pages 473-500.
    6. Barrett, Alan & Coleman, Kieran & Delaney, Liam & Fahey, Tony & Gannon, Brenda & Kearney, Ide & McCarthy, Yvonne & Nolan, Brian & Walsh, John R., 2006. "Budget Perspectives 2007," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BMI192 edited by Callan, Tim.
    7. Patrick Honohan & Brendan Walsh, 2002. "Catching Up with the Leaders: The Irish Hare," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 33(1), pages 1-78.
    8. Hallerberg, Mark & Strauch, Rolf & von Hagen, Jurgen, 2007. "The design of fiscal rules and forms of governance in European Union countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 338-359, June.
    9. Kelly, Eilish & McGuinness, Seamus & O'Connell, Philip, 2009. "Benchmarking, Social Partnership and Higher Remuneration: Wage Settling Institutions and the Public-Private Sector Wage Gap in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 40(3), pages 339-370.
    10. McGuinness, Seamus & Kelly, Elish & O'Connell, Philip J., 2008. "The Impact of Wage Bargaining Regime on Firm-Level Competitiveness and Wage Inequality: The Case of Ireland," Papers WP266, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    11. Callan, Tim & Brick, Aoife & Durkan, Joe & Keane, Claire & Lane, Marguerita & Miles, David & Nolan, Anne & Nolan, Brian & O'Leary, Jim & Walsh, John R., 2010. "Budget Perspectives 2011," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS18.
    12. Callan, Tim & Barrell, Ray & Barrett, Alan & Casserly, Noel & Convery, Frank & Goggin, Jean & Kearney, Ide & Kirby, Simon & Lunn, Pete & O'Brien, Martin & Ryan, Lisa, 2008. "Budget Perspectives 2009," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS4.
    13. John FitzGerald, 2000. "Ireland's Failure-And Belated Convergence," Papers WP133, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    14. Lane, Philip & McCoy, Selina & Smith, Stephen & Smyth, Emer & Van Soest, Arthur & Walsh, John R., 2003. "Budget Perspectives 2004," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BMI172 edited by Callan, Tim & Doris, Aedin & McCoy, Daniel.
    15. Bergin, Adele & Conefrey, Thomas & FitzGerald, John & Kearney, Ide, 2009. "Recovery Scenarios for Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS007.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Dellepiane and Hardiman Working Paper: Ireland's Triple Crisis
      by Liam Delaney in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2011-02-25 07:03:00

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Whelan & Helen Russell & Bertrand Maître, 2016. "Economic Stress and the Great Recession in Ireland: Polarization, Individualization or ‘Middle Class Squeeze’?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(2), pages 503-526, March.
    2. repec:eso:journl:v:47:y:2016:i:4:p:477-498 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sebastian Dellepiane & Niamh Hardiman, 2012. "The New Politics of Austerity: Fiscal Responses to the Economic Crisis in Ireland and Spain," Working Papers 201207, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    4. Gärtner, Manfred & Griesbach, Björn & Mennillo, Giulia, 2013. "The near-death experience of the Celtic Tiger: a model-driven narrative from the European sovereign debt crisis," Economics Working Paper Series 1321, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    5. Niamh Hardiman & Muiris MacCarthaigh, 2013. "How Governments Retrench In Crisis: The Case of Ireland," Working Papers 201315, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    6. Niamh Hardiman, 2013. "Rethinking the political economy of fiscal consolidation in two recessions in Ireland," Working Papers 201316, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    7. Sebastian Dellepiane-Avellaneda & Niamh Hardiman, 2015. "Paying for the Welfare State in the European Periphery," Working Papers 201520, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    8. Paul Gillespie, 2012. "At the receiving end—Irish perspectives and response to the banking and sovereign debt crises," Asia Europe Journal, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 125-139, March.
    9. Hardiman, Niamh, 2011. "Economic crisis and the politics of austerity in Ireland," economic sociology_the european electronic newsletter, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, vol. 12(3), pages 35-37.
    10. Sebastian Dellepiane & Niamh Hardiman, 2012. "Fiscal Politics In Time: Pathways to Fiscal Consolidation, 1980-2012," Working Papers 201228, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    11. Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maítre, 2013. "The Great Recession and the Changing Distribution of Economic Vulnerability by Social Class: The Irish Case," Working Papers 201312, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    12. Sebastian Dellepiane & Niamh Hardiman, 2013. "The politics of fiscal effort in Spain and Ireland: Market credibility versus political legitimacy," Working Papers 201321, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

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