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Culture-based development: empirical evidence for Germany


  • Annie Tubadji


Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive concept for the role of culture in economic growth. Design/methodology/approach - The paper overviews the culture based development (CBD) concept and its precise definition of culture as an encompassing socio-economic factor. The outlined CBD mechanism of impact is expressed in a testable empirical model. Alternative approaches for operationalizing the CBD definition of cultural capital are suggested and a real data application on intra-regional level (for German Findings - The findings illustrate the ability of the CBD model to capture the statistical significance of culture. Originality/value - The paper demonstrates the two innovative elements of the CBD approach to culture: first, measuring culture with a factor variable as a better alternative to the mono-dimensional variables inferred by the state of the art; and second, thus capturing the overall economic meaning of the cultural factor (not just one aspect of it) for local socio-economic development.

Suggested Citation

  • Annie Tubadji, 2012. "Culture-based development: empirical evidence for Germany," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(9), pages 690-703, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ijsepp:v:39:y:2012:i:9:p:690-703

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard Florida, 2002. "Bohemia and economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 55-71, January.
    2. Guido Tabellini, 2010. "Culture and Institutions: Economic Development in the Regions of Europe," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 677-716, June.
    3. Bruno S. Frey & Lasse Steiner, 2010. "World Heritage List: does it make sense?," IEW - Working Papers 484, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    4. Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Peri, Giovanni, 2005. "Cities and cultures," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 304-337, September.
    5. Hicks, J. R., 1969. "A Theory of Economic History," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198811633, June.
    6. Baycan, T. & Nijkamp, P., 2011. "A socio-economic impact analysis of cultural diversity," Serie Research Memoranda 0012, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    7. Akgun, A.A. & Leeuwen, E.S. van & Nijkamp, P., 2011. "A systemic perspective on multi-stakeholder sustainable development strategies," Serie Research Memoranda 0009, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    8. Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri, 2016. "The economic value of cultural diversity: evidence from US cities," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Economics of International Migration, chapter 7, pages 229-264 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    9. KruegerJR, Norris F. & Reilly, Michael D. & Carsrud, Alan L., 2000. "Competing models of entrepreneurial intentions," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 15(5-6), pages 411-432.
    10. Annie Tubadji & Frank Pelzel, 2015. "Culture based development: measuring an invisible resource using the PLS-PM method," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(12), pages 1050-1070, December.
    11. Nathan, Max, 2007. "The Wrong Stuff? Creative Class Theory and Economic Performance in UK Cities," MPRA Paper 29486, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tubadji, Annie, 2016. "A Seminal Handbook for Empirical 'Hitch-Hiking' through Cultural Diversity and Its Impacs: The Economics of Cultural Diversity, Peter Nijkamp, Jacques Poot and Jessie Bakens (eds.), Edward Elgar Publi," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 55-56.
    2. Erik E. Lehmann & Nikolaus Seitz & Katharine Wirsching, 2017. "Smart finance for smart places to foster new venture creation," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 44(1), pages 51-75, March.
    3. Annie Tubadji & Peter Nijkamp, 2016. "Six degrees of cultural diversity and R&D output efficiency," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 247-264, October.


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