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Did Jose Canseco Really Improve the Performance of His Teammates by Spreading Steroids? A Critique of Gould and Kaplan

Author

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  • John Charles Bradbury

Abstract

In an article titled “Learning Unethical Practices from a Co-worker: The Peer Effect of Jose Canseco,” published in Labour Economics in 2011, Eric Gould and Todd Kaplan use baseball player Jose Canseco to study peer effects among co-workers. Their analysis focuses on Canseco spreading knowledge of performance-enhancing drugs to teammates. The authors claim to find evidence of Canseco’s influence through the improved performance of his former teammates. This paper reexamines the performance of Canseco’s teammates and finds no empirical evidence of a performance improvement among Canseco’s teammates. In addition, I contend that Gould and Kaplan’s own empirical findings do not support some of the claims they make.

Suggested Citation

  • John Charles Bradbury, 2013. "Did Jose Canseco Really Improve the Performance of His Teammates by Spreading Steroids? A Critique of Gould and Kaplan," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 10(1), pages 40-69, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ejw:journl:v:10:y:2013:i:1:p:40-69
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gould, Eric D. & Kaplan, Todd R., 2011. "Learning unethical practices from a co-worker: The peer effect of Jose Canseco," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 338-348, June.
    2. Arthur De Vany, 2011. "Steroids And Home Runs," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(2), pages 489-511, April.
    3. John Charles Bradbury & Douglas J. Drinen, 2008. "Pigou at the Plate," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 9(2), pages 211-224, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eric D. Gould & Todd R. Kaplan, 2013. "The Peer Effect of Jose Canseco: A Reply to J. C. Bradbury," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 10(1), pages 70-86, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Peer effects; externalities; productivity; team production;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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    1. Did Jose Canseco Really Improve the Performance of His Teammates by Spreading Steroids? A Critique of Gould and Kaplan (EJW 2013) in ReplicationWiki

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