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Social Capital and Improved Stoves Usage Decisions in the Northern Peruvian Andes

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  • Agurto Adrianzén, Marcos

Abstract

This paper explores how village level technology usage patterns and bonding social capital (the strength of intra-communal links) mutually influence the individual usage decision of an improved stove in the Peruvian Andes. It shows that the individual usage likelihood is more responsive to village usage patterns if communal bonding links are relatively strong, and that bonding social capital discourages individual usage if the proportion of beneficiaries experiencing usage problems is relatively high. Usage problems were mainly related to faulty stove’s materials, which were likely exogenous to households’ characteristics. Social capital was measured before the intervention, which alleviates reverse causality issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Agurto Adrianzén, Marcos, 2014. "Social Capital and Improved Stoves Usage Decisions in the Northern Peruvian Andes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-17.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:54:y:2014:i:c:p:1-17
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.07.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Levien, Michael, 2015. "Social Capital as Obstacle to Development: Brokering Land, Norms, and Trust in Rural India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 77-92.
    2. Esther Gehrke, 2014. "An employment guarantee as risk insurance? Assessing the effects of the NREGS on agricultural production decisions," Working Papers 152, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).

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