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Geography of Gender Gaps: Regional Patterns of Income and Farm–Nonfarm Interaction Among Male- and Female-Headed Households in Eight African Countries

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  • Andersson Djurfeldt, Agnes
  • Djurfeldt, Göran
  • Bergman Lodin, Johanna

Abstract

Many studies stress the existence of gender based income gaps across African production systems. Contextualizing such gaps in relation to regional characteristics, production systems, and nonfarm linkages challenges this. Household level data from 21 regions across eight African countries, collected in 2002 and 2008, are used to analyze production dynamics, market participation, and nonfarm linkages. Gender gaps are absent in 17 of the regions regardless of the overall regional income level. The results suggest that neither poverty nor growth in general discriminates against female headed households, but that causes of gender discrimination need to be found in specific regional contexts.

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  • Andersson Djurfeldt, Agnes & Djurfeldt, Göran & Bergman Lodin, Johanna, 2013. "Geography of Gender Gaps: Regional Patterns of Income and Farm–Nonfarm Interaction Among Male- and Female-Headed Households in Eight African Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 32-47.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:48:y:2013:i:c:p:32-47 DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.03.011
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    Cited by:

    1. Flatø, Martin & Muttarak, Raya & Pelser, André, 2017. "Women, Weather, and Woes: The Triangular Dynamics of Female-Headed Households, Economic Vulnerability, and Climate Variability in South Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 41-62.
    2. Meijer, Seline S. & Sileshi, Gudeta W. & Kundhlande, Godfrey & Catacutan, Delia & Nieuwenhuis, Maarten, 2015. "The Role of Gender and Kinship Structure in Household Decision-Making for Agriculture and Tree Planting in Malawi," Journal of Gender, Agriculture and Food Security, Africa Centre for Gender, Social Research and Impact Assessment, vol. 1(1), March.
    3. Sheahan, Megan & Barrett, Christopher B., 2017. "Ten striking facts about agricultural input use in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 12-25.
    4. Dzanku, Fred M. & Jirström, Magnus & Marstorp, Håkan, 2015. "Yield Gap-Based Poverty Gaps in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 336-362.
    5. Vimefall, Elin, 2015. "Income diversification among female-headed farming households," Working Papers 2015:11, Örebro University, School of Business.

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