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State-led Technological Development: A Case of China’s Nanotechnology Development

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  • Huang, Can
  • Wu, Yilin

Abstract

We analyze nanotechnology patent applications filed in China from 1998 to 2008 and find that the extraordinary pace of nanotechnology development achieved over that period has been promoted primarily by the public sector rather than being driven by industry and market forces. This finding implies that developing countries such as China with public research capacity and commitment to technological development can make rapid progress in basic research in emerging technologies, but it remains uncertain whether and when local industry can benefit from public R&D investment enough to enable active development of indigenous innovation.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang, Can & Wu, Yilin, 2012. "State-led Technological Development: A Case of China’s Nanotechnology Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 970-982.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:5:p:970-982
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2011.11.013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Can Huang & Celeste Amorim & Joaquim Borges Gouveia & Mark Spinoglio & Augusto Medina, 2004. "Organization, Program and Structure: An Analysis of the Chinese Innovation Policy Framework," Working Papers de Economia (Economics Working Papers) 17, Departamento de Economia, Gestão e Engenharia Industrial, Universidade de Aveiro.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fu, Hui-Zhen & Ho, Yuh-Shan, 2013. "Independent research of China in Science Citation Index Expanded during 1980–2011," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 210-222.
    2. Wipo, 2015. "World Intellectual Property Report 2015 - Breakthrough Innovation and Economic Growth," WIPO Economics & Statistics Series, World Intellectual Property Organization - Economics and Statistics Division, number 2015:944, October.
    3. FUJII Hidemichi & MANAGI Shunsuke, 2017. "Trends and Priority Shifts in Artificial Intelligence Technology Invention: A global patent analysis," Discussion papers 17066, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. repec:bla:worlde:v:40:y:2017:i:11:p:2424-2454 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Shang, Qingyan & Poon, Jessie P.H. & Yue, Qingtang, 2012. "The role of regional knowledge spillovers on China's innovation," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1164-1175.
    6. Christian O. Fisch & Joern H. Block & Philipp G. Sandner, 2016. "Chinese university patents: quantity, quality, and the role of subsidy programs," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 60-84, February.
    7. Siping Luo & Mary E. Lovely & David Popp, 2013. "Intellectual Returnees as Drivers of Indigenous Innovation: Evidence from the Chinese Photovoltaic Industry," NBER Working Papers 19518, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Böing, Philipp & Müller, Elisabeth & Sandner, Philipp, 2013. "In-house R&D and External Knowledge Acquisition What Makes Chinese Firms Productive?," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80037, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    9. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2017:i:1:p:59-:d:124598 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    nanotechnology; Asia; China; R&D; patent; state-led;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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