IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/11181.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Socio-economic Impact of Nanoscale Science: Initial Results and NanoBank

Author

Listed:
  • Lynne G. Zucker
  • Michael R. Darby

Abstract

Research on the nanoscale has revolutionized areas of science and has begun to have an impact on, and be impacted by, society and economy. We are capturing early traces of these processes in NanoBank, a large scale, multi-year project to provide a public data resource which will link individuals and organizations involved in creating and using nano S&T across a number of activities including publishing, patenting, research funding, and commercial financing, innovation and production. We report preliminary results from our work in progress. Nanotechnology is on a similar trajectory to biotechnology in terms of patents and publication, already accounting for over 2.5% of scientific articles and 0.7% of patents. Joint university-firm research is widespread and increasing. Regional agglomeration is also evident in both science and commercial applications, with the main clusters of firm entry by both new and pre-existing firms forming around major research universities publishing in nanoscience. Nanoscience has been highly concentrated in the United States, a few European countries, and Japan, but China has recently passed Japan in total articles per year and is beginning to have a significant number of highly-cited articles.

Suggested Citation

  • Lynne G. Zucker & Michael R. Darby, 2005. "Socio-economic Impact of Nanoscale Science: Initial Results and NanoBank," NBER Working Papers 11181, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11181
    Note: PR
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w11181.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Jensen & Marie Thursby, 1998. "Proofs and Prototypes for Sale: The Tale of University Licensing," NBER Working Papers 6698, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Klevorick, Alvin K. & Levin, Richard C. & Nelson, Richard R. & Winter, Sidney G., 1995. "On the sources and significance of interindustry differences in technological opportunities," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 185-205, March.
    3. Harberger, Arnold C, 1998. "A Vision of the Growth Process," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 1-32, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Zucker, Lynne G. & Darby, Michael R. & Furner, Jonathan & Liu, Robert C. & Ma, Hongyan, 2007. "Minerva unbound: Knowledge stocks, knowledge flows and new knowledge production," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 850-863, July.
    2. Can Huang & Ad Notten & Nico Rasters, 2011. "Nanoscience and technology publications and patents: a review of social science studies and search strategies," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 145-172, April.
    3. Andrea Fernández-Ribas & Philip Shapira, 2009. "Technological diversity, scientific excellence and the location of inventive activities abroad: the case of nanotechnology," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 286-303, June.
    4. Gnidchenko, Andrey, 2011. "Моделирование Технологических И Институциональных Эффектов В Макроэкономическом Прогнозировании
      [Technological and Institutional Effects Modeling in Macroeconomic Forecasting]
      ," MPRA Paper 35484, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised May 2011.
    5. Martin Meyer & Dirk Libaers & Jae-Hwan Park, 2011. "The Emergence of Novel Science-related Fields: Regional or Technological Patterns? Exploration and Exploitation in United Kingdom Nanotechnology," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(7), pages 935-959.
    6. Borje Johansson & Hans Loof, 2008. "Innovation Activities Explained By Firm Attributes And Location," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(6), pages 533-552.
    7. Jan Youtie & Philip Shapira, 2008. "Mapping the nanotechnology enterprise: a multi-indicator analysis of emerging nanodistricts in the US South," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 209-223, April.
    8. Fiedler, Marina & Welpe, Isabell M., 2010. "Antecedents of cooperative commercialisation strategies of nanotechnology firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 400-410, April.
    9. Lynne G. Zucker & Michael R. Darby, 2009. "Star Scientists, Innovation and Regional and National Immigration," Chapters,in: Entrepreneurship and Openness, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. repec:spr:scient:v:102:y:2015:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1432-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. David Roessner & Lynne Manrique & Jongwon Park, 2010. "The economic impact of engineering research centers: preliminary results of a pilot study," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 35(5), pages 475-493, October.
    12. Zhou, Ping & Leydesdorff, Loet, 2006. "The emergence of China as a leading nation in science," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 83-104, February.
    13. Börje Johansson & Hans Lööf & Amy Rade Olsson, 2005. "Firm location, Corporate Structure, R&D Investment, Innovation and Productivity," ERSA conference papers ersa05p108, European Regional Science Association.
    14. Roger Geiger, 2012. "University supply and corporate demand for academic research," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 175-191, April.
    15. Heinze, Thomas, 2006. "Emergence of nano S&T in Germany: network formation and company performance," Discussion Papers "Innovation Systems and Policy Analysis" 7, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    16. repec:spr:scient:v:111:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2350-x is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Schmoch, Ulrich & Thielmann, Axel, 2012. "Cyclical long-term development of complex technologies: Premature expectations in nanotechnology?," Discussion Papers "Innovation Systems and Policy Analysis" 31, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
    18. Broström, Anders & Lööf, Hans, 2008. "How does University Collaboration Contribute to Successful R&D Management?," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 131, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    19. Andrea Fernández-Ribas, 2010. "International Patent Strategies of Small and Large Firms: An Empirical Study of Nanotechnology," Review of Policy Research, Policy Studies Organization, vol. 27(4), pages 457-473, July.
    20. David Mowery, 2011. "Nanotechnology and the US national innovation system: continuity and change," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 36(6), pages 697-711, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • L63 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Microelectronics; Computers; Communications Equipment
    • L65 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Chemicals; Rubber; Drugs; Biotechnology; Plastics
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11181. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.