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In-house R&D and External Knowledge Acquisition What Makes Chinese Firms Productive?

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  • Böing, Philipp
  • Müller, Elisabeth
  • Sandner, Philipp

Abstract

This paper analyses the influence of in-house R&D and external knowledge acquisition on the total factor productivity (TFP) of listed Chinese firms for the time period 2001-2010. We find a quantitatively important positive effect of in-house R&D. The achieved level of technological sophistication of Chinese firms is sufficient to benefit from R&D collaboration with domestic partners. We do not find a significant effect for employing inventors with access to international knowledge or for collaborating with international partners. International knowledge acquisition is only effective if conducted via joint ventures, i.e. if it is supported by a deep organizational relationship.

Suggested Citation

  • Böing, Philipp & Müller, Elisabeth & Sandner, Philipp, 2013. "In-house R&D and External Knowledge Acquisition What Makes Chinese Firms Productive?," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80037, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:80037
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O39 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Other

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