IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/wdevel/v39y2011i6p1051-1060.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Equity and Distributional Implications of Climate Change

Author

Listed:
  • Markandya, Anil

Abstract

Summary This paper looks at the climate change problem from an equity perspective. It compares utilitarian approaches with ones based on rights or capabilities. It argues that few of the proposals that have been discussed in the literature have an ethical basis, while those that do have a number of problems. The paper looks at the practicalities of addressing the equity problem in international negotiations. Two specific dimensions of the equity problem in the context of climate change are explored further in the paper: those relating to uncertainty and those relating to discounting.

Suggested Citation

  • Markandya, Anil, 2011. "Equity and Distributional Implications of Climate Change," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 1051-1060, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:6:p:1051-1060
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X11000635
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Panayotou, Theodore & Sachs, Jeffrey D. & Zwane, Alix Peterson, 2002. "Compensation for "Meaningful Participation" in Climate Change Control: A Modest Proposal and Empirical Analysis," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 437-454, May.
    2. Vaillancourt, Kathleen & Waaub, Jean-Philippe, 2004. "Equity in international greenhouse gases abatement scenarios: A multicriteria approach," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 153(2), pages 489-505, March.
    3. Bosello, Francesco & Roson, Roberto & Tol, Richard S.J., 2006. "Economy-wide estimates of the implications of climate change: Human health," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 579-591, June.
    4. Tol, Richard S. J. & Verheyen, Roda, 2004. "State responsibility and compensation for climate change damages--a legal and economic assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1109-1130, June.
    5. Martin L. Weitzman, 2001. "Gamma Discounting," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 260-271, March.
    6. Alexander Golub & Anil Markandya & Dominic Marcellino, 2006. "Does The Kyoto Protocol Cost Too Much And Create Unbreakable Barriers For Economic Growth?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 24(4), pages 520-535, October.
    7. Halsnaes, Kirsten & Olhoff, Anne, 2005. "International markets for greenhouse gas emission reduction policies--possibilities for integrating developing countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(18), pages 2313-2325, December.
    8. Peter Bohm & Björn Carlén, 2002. "A Cost-effective Approach to Attracting Low-income Countries to International Emissions Trading: Theory and Experiments," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 23(2), pages 187-211, October.
    9. Leimbach, Marian, 2003. "Equity and carbon emissions trading: a model analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1033-1044, August.
    10. Adam Rose & Brandt Stevens & Jae Edmonds & Marshall Wise, 1998. "International Equity and Differentiation in Global Warming Policy," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 12(1), pages 25-51, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Antimiani & Valeria Costantini & Anil Markandya & Chiara Martini & Alessandro Palma, 2014. "A dynamic CGE modelling approach for analyzing trade-offs in climate change policy options: the case of Green Climate Fund," Working Papers 2014-05, BC3.
    2. Costantini, Valeria & Sforna, Giorgia & Zoli, Mariangela, 2016. "Interpreting bargaining strategies of developing countries in climate negotiations. A quantitative approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 128-139.
    3. Aurélie Méjean & Franck Lecocq & Yacob Mulugetta, 2015. "Equity, burden sharing and development pathways: reframing international climate negotiations," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 387-402, November.
    4. Barrett, Sam, 2014. "Subnational Climate Justice? Adaptation Finance Distribution and Climate Vulnerability," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 130-142.
    5. Clarke, Leon & McFarland, James & Octaviano, Claudia & van Ruijven, Bas & Beach, Robert & Daenzer, Kathryn & Herreras Martínez, Sara & Lucena, André F.P. & Kitous, Alban & Labriet, Maryse & Loboguerre, 2016. "Long-term abatement potential and current policy trajectories in Latin American countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 513-525.
    6. Markandya, A. & Antimiani, A. & Costantini, V. & Martini, C. & Palma, A. & Tommasino, M.C., 2015. "Analyzing Trade-offs in International Climate Policy Options: The Case of the Green Climate Fund," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 93-107.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:39:y:2011:i:6:p:1051-1060. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.